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Academic Standards for Science in Indiana

The Academic Standards for Science in Indiana you can cover using "To MARS with MER" are listed below. We hope you will discover additional standards you can use. These are the ones our Instructional Materials Development team felt most directly related to the activities planned for "To MARS with MER".

Academic Standards for Science in Indiana

Grade 3

Standard 1 - The Nature of Science and Technology
It is the union of science and technology that forms the scientific endeavor and that makes it so successful. Although each of these human enterprises has a character and history of its own, each is dependent on and reinforces the other. This first standard draws portraits of science and technology that emphasize their roles in the scientific endeavor and reveal some of the similarities and connections between them. In order for students to truly understand the nature of science and technology, they must model the process of scientific investigation through inquiries, fieldwork, lab work, etc. Through these experiences, students will practice designing investigations and experiments, making observations, and formulating theories based on evidence.

Standard 2 - Scientific Thinking
There are certain thinking skills associated with science, mathematics, and technology that young people need to develop during their school years. These are mostly, but not exclusively, mathematical and logical skills that are essential tools for both formal and informal learning and for a lifetime of participation in society as a whole. Good communication is also essential in order to both receive and disseminate information and to understand others' ideas as well as have one's own ideas understood. Writing, in the form of journals, essays, lab reports, procedural summaries, etc., should be an integral component of students' experiences in science.

Standard 3 - The Physical Setting
One of the grand success stories of science is the unification of the physical universe. It turns out that all natural objects, events, and processes are connected to each other. This standard contains recommendations for basic knowledge about the overall structure of the universe and the physical principles on which it seems to run, with emphasis on Earth and the solar system. This standard focuses on two principle subjects: the structure of the universe and the major processes that have shaped planet Earth, and the concepts with which science describes the physical world in general - organized under the headings of Matter and Energy and Forces of Nature. In Grade 3, students learn that most changes that occur on Earth and in the sky are observable.

Standard 4 - The Living Environment
People have long been curious about living things - how many different species there are, what they are like, how they relate to each other, and how they behave. Living organisms are made of the same components as all other matter, involve the same kinds of transformations of energy, and move using the same basic kinds of forces. Thus, all of the physical principles discussed in Standard 3 - The Physical Setting, apply to life as well as to stars, raindrops, and television sets. This standard offers recommendations on basic knowledge about how living things function and how they interact with one another and their environment. In Grade 3, students learn that adaptations in physical structure or behavior may improve an organism's chance for survival.

Standard 5 - The Mathematical World
Mathematics is essentially a process of thinking that involves building and applying abstract, logically connected networks of ideas. These ideas often arise from the need to solve problems in science, technology, and everyday life - problems ranging from how to model certain aspects of a complex scientific problem to how to balance a checkbook.

Standard 6 - Common Themes
Some important themes pervade science, mathematics, and technology and appear over and over again, whether we are looking at ancient civilization, the human body, or a comet. These ideas transcend disciplinary boundaries and prove fruitful in explanation, in theory, in observation, and in design. A focus on Constancy and Change within this standard provides students opportunities to engage in long-term and on-going laboratory and field work, and thus understand the role of change over time in studying The Physical Setting and The Living Environment.

Standard 1
The Nature of Science and Technology
Students, working collaboratively, carry out investigations. They question, observe, and make accurate measurements. Students increase their use of tools, record data in journals, and communicate results through chart, graph, written, and verbal forms.

The Scientific View of the World
3.1.1 Recognize and explain that when a scientific investigation is repeated, a similar result is expected.

Scientific Inquiry
3.1.2 Participate in different types of guided scientific investigations, such as observing objects and events and collecting specimens for analysis.
3.1.3 Keep and report records of investigations and observations* using tools, such as journals, charts, graphs, and computers.
3.1.4 Discuss the results of investigations and consider the explanations of others.

* observation: gaining information through the use of one or more of the senses, such as sight, smell, etc.

The Scientific Enterprise
3.1.5 Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively while respecting the ideas of others and communicating one's own conclusions about findings.

Technology and Science
3.1.6 Give examples of how tools, such as automobiles, computers, and electric motors, have affected the way we live.
3.1.7 Recognize that and explain how an invention can be used in different ways, such as a radio being used to get information and for entertainment.

Standard 2
Scientific Thinking
Students use a variety of skills and techniques when attempting to answer questions and solve problems. They describe their observations accurately and clearly, using numbers, words, and sketches, and are able to communicate their thinking to others. Computation and Estimation 3.2.1 Add and subtract whole numbers* mentally, on paper, and with a calculator.

* whole number: 0, 1, 2, 3, etc.

Manipulation and Observation
3.2.2 Measure and mix dry and liquid materials in prescribed amounts, following reasonable safety precautions.
3.2.3 Keep a notebook that describes observations and is understandable weeks or months later.
3.2.4 Appropriately use simple tools, such as clamps, rulers, scissors, hand lenses, and other technology, such as calculators and computers, to help solve problems.
3.2.5 Construct something used for performing a task out of paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects.

Communication Skills
3.2.6 Make sketches and write descriptions to aid in explaining procedures or ideas.

Critical Response Skills
3.2.7 Ask "How do you know?" in appropriate situations and attempt reasonable answers when others ask the same question.

Standard 5

The Mathematical World
Students apply mathematics in scientific contexts. Students make more precise and varied measurements when gathering data. Based upon collected data, they pose questions and solve problems. Students use numbers to record data and construct graphs and tables to communicate their findings.

Numbers
3.5.1 Select and use appropriate measuring units, such as centimeters (cm) and meters (m), grams (g) and kilograms (kg), and degrees Celsius (C).
3.5.2 Observe that and describe how some measurements are likely to be slightly different, even if what is being measured stays the same.

Shapes and Symbolic Relationships
3.5.3 Construct tables and graphs to show how values of one quantity are related to values of another.
3.5.4 Illustrate that if 0 and 1 are located on a line, any other number can be depicted as a position on the line.

Reasoning and Uncertainty
3.5.5 Explain that one way to make sense of something is to think of how it relates to something more familiar.

Standard 6

Common Themes
Students work with an increasing variety of systems and begin to modify parts in systems and models and notice the changes that result. They question why change occurs.

Systems
3.6.1 Investigate how and describe that when parts are put together, they can do things that they could not do by themselves.
3.6.2 Investigate how and describe that something may not work if some of its parts are missing.

Models and Scale
3.6.3 Explain how a model of something is different from the real thing but can be used to learn something about the real thing.

Standard 1 - The Nature of Science and Technology
It is the union of science and technology that forms the scientific endeavor and that makes it so successful. Although each of these human enterprises has a character and history of its own, each is dependent on and reinforces the other. This first standard draws portraits of science and technology that emphasize their roles in the scientific endeavor and reveal some of the similarities and connections between them. In order for students to truly understand the nature of science and technology, they must model the process of scientific investigation through inquiries, fieldwork, lab work, etc. Through these experiences, students will practice designing investigations and experiments, making observations, and formulating theories based on evidence.

Standard 2 - Scientific Thinking
There are certain thinking skills associated with science, mathematics, and technology that young people need to develop during their school years. These are mostly, but not exclusively, mathematical and logical skills that are essential tools for both formal and informal learning and for a lifetime of participation in society as a whole. Good communication is also essential in order to both receive and disseminate information and to understand others' ideas as well as have one's own ideas understood. Writing, in the form of journals, essays, lab reports, procedural summaries, etc., should be an integral component of students' experiences in science.

Standard 3 - The Physical Setting
One of the grand success stories of science is the unification of the physical universe. It turns out that all natural objects, events, and processes are connected to each other. This standard contains recommendations for basic knowledge about the overall structure of the universe and the physical principles on which it seems to run, with emphasis on Earth and the solar system. This standard focuses on two principle subjects: the structure of the universe and the major processes that have shaped planet Earth, and the concepts with which science describes the physical world in general - organized under the headings of Matter and Energy and Forces of Nature. In Grade 4, students learn that the properties of rocks reflect the processes that formed them. They investigate force and energy.

Standard 4 - The Living Environment
People have long been curious about living things - how many different species there are, what they are like, how they relate to each other, and how they behave. Living organisms are made of the same components as all other matter, involve the same kinds of transformations of energy, and move using the same basic kinds of forces. Thus, all of the physical principles discussed in Standard 3 - The Physical Setting, apply to life as well as to stars, raindrops, and television sets. This standard offers recommendations on basic knowledge about how living things function and how they interact with one another and their environment. In Grade 4, students learn that all organisms need energy and matter to live and grow.

Standard 5 - The Mathematical World
Mathematics is essentially a process of thinking that involves building and applying abstract, logically connected networks of ideas. These ideas often arise from the need to solve problems in science, technology, and everyday life - problems ranging from how to model certain aspects of a complex scientific problem to how to balance a checkbook.

Standard 6 - Common Themes
Some important themes pervade science, mathematics, and technology and appear over and over again, whether we are looking at ancient civilization, the human body, or a comet. These ideas transcend disciplinary boundaries and prove fruitful in explanation, in theory, in observation, and in design. A focus on Constancy and Change within this standard provides students opportunities to engage in long-term and on-going laboratory and fieldwork, and thus understand the role of change over time in studying The Physical Setting and The Living Environment.

Grade 4

Standard 1

The Nature of Science and Technology
Students, working collaboratively, carry out investigations. They observe and make accurate measurements, increase their use of tools and instruments, record data in journals, and communicate results through chart, graph, written, and verbal forms.

The Scientific View of the World
4.1.1 Observe and describe that scientific investigations generally work the same way in different places.

Scientific Inquiry
4.1.2 Recognize and describe that results of scientific investigations are seldom exactly the same. If differences occur, such as a large variation in the measurement of plant growth, propose reasons for why these differences exist, using recorded information about investigations.

The Scientific Enterprise
4.1.3 Explain that clear communication is an essential part of doing science since it enables scientists to inform others about their work, to expose their ideas to evaluation by other scientists, and to allow scientists to stay informed about scientific discoveries around the world.
4.1.4 Describe how people all over the world have taken part in scientific investigation for many centuries.

Technology and Science
4.1.5 Demonstrate how measuring instruments, such as microscopes, telescopes, and cameras, can be used to gather accurate information for making scientific comparisons of objects and events. Note that measuring instruments, such as rulers, can also be used for designing and constructing things that will work properly.
4.1.6 Explain that even a good design may fail even though steps are taken ahead of time to reduce the likelihood of failure.
4.1.7 Discuss and give examples of how technology, such as computers and medicines, has improved the lives of many people, although the benefits are not equally available to all.

Standard 2

Scientific Thinking
Students use a variety of skills and tec