updates-lfrf/updates-lfrf.9802


LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST Update   February 12, 1998  Volume 7, Issue 10


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST Update   February 12, 1998  Volume 7, Issue 10
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 09:40:28 -0700
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LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST Update February 12, 1998 Volume 7, Issue 10

--------------------------------------------

Live from Amazonia
The LFRF Preview Website
The Great LFRF "Backyard Biodiversity"Survey
Journal of the Week: Marty Stickle
LFRF Videos, Teacher's Guide and Multimedia Kit
Websites of the Week
PTK Online Services

--------------------------------------------


LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST is progressing rapidly. The preview Website is
absolutely outstanding. The production crew is down in the Amazon
rainforest taking care of production details. The Teacher's Guide is in
production. Read on for more news!


Live from Amazonia

An update from Amazonia: Geoff Haines-Stiles, LFRF project director and his
team which includes NASA satellite engineers have just completed their
technical reconnaissance at Camp 41, a research site in the rainforest about
2 1/2 hours from Manaus. Their mission was to determine the feasibility of
transmitting a KA-band satellite signal from this location. Remember there's
a lot of tall trees and a lot of rain--and neither of those things are
"satellite-friendly." Our crew moves next to a flooded forest location.
We'll report next Updates on their progress.


LFRF Preview Website

The LFRF preview website at http://passporttoknowledge.com/rainforest is up
and running. You can enjoy the basic structure of the site and meet some of
the team-members. Our PTK design team has done a marvelous job with this
site. We will continue to update the site throughout the project, updating
Team Member journals, adding a wealth of background information, and, of
course, posting you and your students' submissions. Remember, this is just
the "beta" version. The final version will be at the same URL towards the
end of the month.

Several of the lesson plans are online at the website. If you're eager to
get your students started, try those out. We will add a few online
activities, such as the Solar Noon Mini-Collaborative activity, but the
majority of the lessons are in the Teacher's Guide (see below for ordering
info).

Not sure exactly how this all works or if it will fit into your schedule or
work with your particular group of students? Go to the "Educators" section
and contact one of the teacher mentors who've done it before. There are a
wide variety of backgrounds in the mentor group from technology specialists
to kindergarten teachers to middle school teachers with no computers at
school. Talk to the one who seems to suit your needs (or ask coordinator
Eileen Bendixson to match you up) and get all your questions answered.

You may want to upgrade your browser to take full advantage of the site.
Netscape 4.04 is now available for FREE at
http://www.Netscape.com/download/index.html?cp=hmp02sdow


Evaluating Your Goals

To help you plan your curriculum and focus your rainforest unit, PTK, along
with EDC (Education Development Center), has designed the Passport to
Knowledge Assessment Profile. This self-assessment profile helps you to
consider which portions of the program you feel are most important for your
students--group work, scientific investigations, problem solving, etc. By
doing the assessment, you can then know which parts of the program you may
want to use more--journals for writing, the collaborative investigation for
problem solving, the mold race to fulfill biology standards, etc. You'll
also see results and evaluations for past PTK projects--Live from
Antarctica, Mars, Hubble, etc.-- and learn how other teachers have used the
program in their classrooms. All this and more at the Evaluation and
Assessment site: http://www.edc.org/CCT/ptk/ea/


The Great LFRF "Backyard Biodiversity" Survey

THE LFRF "Backyard Biodiversity" Survey is now underway. It's time to
subscribe to "Discuss-LFRF" so you and your students can participate in this
exciting collaborative project. As preparation for what promises to be an
exciting and challenging undertaking, we suggest your students read Susan
Laurence and Heraldo Vasconceles' journals in the "Teams" section.

In order for your students to understand the activity more fully, they could
do some background activities, such as the "One Square Meter" activity
available on the website before the Survey debate starts. This is in the
"Educators" section of the Website under "Lesson Plans." More details will
be coming soon.

The LFRF Teacher's Guide has a number of other hands-on Activities that will
complement the Backyard Biodiversity Survey. You can order the Teacher's
Guide ($20 incl. s/h) or Multimedia Teacher Kit ($125 Incl.. s/h) online.
Or print the online order form and mail to: Passport to Knowledge, PO Box
1502, Summit NJ 07902-1502 or fax it to: 908-277-9590. These materials will
be available late-Feb./early March.

For the rest of February, educators and the PTK development team will
finalize the logistics and the timeline on the discuss-lfrf mail-list. Join
DISCUSS-LFRF to participate in and learn more about this exciting project.
To subscribe to discuss-lfrf send an e-mail message to:

listmanager@passporttoknowledge.com

and in the body of the message write:

subscribe discuss-lfrf

Or visit our web site "Interact" section
http://passporttoknowledge.com/rainforest to register online.

Project Timeline:
February 3rd-28th: Educators response/input via DISCUSS-lfrf
March 8th: Survey Design -- Student Debate Debuts
March 30th: Survey Design Consensus Week
April 7th: LFRF Program 1: Data Gathering Begins
April 21st: LFRF Program 3: Data Gathering Showcased on Program 3
May 1st: Backyard Diversity Data Posted Online
May 8th: Backyard Biodiversity Challenge Posted
May 22nd: Challenge Winners Announced!


Journal of the Week: Marty Stickle

Marty Stickle, a member of the LFRF Curriculum Development team and a high
school biology teacher, shares some thoughts about how the rainforest can
affect our students. Marty has been travelling to the rainforest for many
years, often as expedition leader of field trips with high school students.
This year Marty and his students will be in Costa Rica in April, the same
time as our live broadcasts. They will be field correspondents for LFRF
during this trip. We look forward to their journals, e-mail and to sharing
their experiences virtually.


Arrival in Corcovado:

We met at the high school at 4:30 am for the ride to the airport and the
American Airlines flight to Miami where we changed planes for the flight to
San Jose, Costa Rica. Upon arrival we met our Costa Rican biologist and
guide, Carlos Gomez. We immediately boarded single engine planes and began
the one hour flight to Corcovado National Park. This area is a very remote
and unspoiled primary forest area on the southern Pacific coast of Costa
Rica. Our planes flew over the mountain peaks and began the long descent to
the lowland forest of the Osa Peninsula. Miles and miles of unspoiled
forest greeted our arrival as the planes landed on what is little more than
a grass field. We stepped out of the planes and into a furnace of heat and
humidity. The students were in shock. They looked around with nervous
laughter. Eight hours earlier they were at Newark Airport in New Jersey.
Now they were in the seriously "wild." But their nervousness quickly turned
to excitement as they noticed the trees along the airstrip filled with
spider monkeys and scarlet macaws. Five minutes on the ground and we
already had our first wildlife sightings.

That night we slept in two person tents in the forest. The hubbub of
nervous, but excited, teenagers eventually gave way to the sounds of the
forest. There were frogs, insects, and the occasional rustling of trees. A
tapir, weighing about 600 pounds, walked right by our camp and through our
flashlight beams. These extremely endangered herbivores (the largest in the
new world) are not so rare in Corcovado. We awoke to the bellowing of the
howler monkeys not far into the forest. It was breakfast and off into the
forest for our first hike.

Our local trapper, Felipe Arias, led the way along with Carlos our guide.
The students marveled at the profusion of green and the beautiful morpho
butterflies and other insects. Then the monkeys arrived. Suddenly we are
surrounded by perhaps 30 to 40 squirrel monkeys. The smallest primates in
Costa Rica, they seemed as interested in my students as they were of them.
The sight of 18 hyperventilating teenagers will always stay with me. Never
have I seen such excitement. I stepped away from the group a little and
photographed the kid's reaction. I've seen monkeys many times in the wild,
but at that moment, the student reaction was even more exciting to me. All
the work and effort to organize the trips was paid back by my own experience
in witnessing this reaction of my students. The monkeys began to try to
scare us off. First they shouted, shook branches and finally threw sticks
at us. The students wondered what was going on. Then several monkeys threw
feces down on us. Two students were "decorated" and became instant
celebrities. Laughter and excitement all round, and this was only the first
hike on the first day!


LFRF Videos, Teacher's Guide and Multimedia Kit

LFRF consists of 3 electronic field trips to the Brazilian rainforest to be
broadcast live at 13:00 hours Eastern on April 7, 14 and 21 on participating
PBS stations and NASA-TV. Schools may also downlink and record the
telecasts directly. Contact PTK to register and receive coordinates and
current information. (Phone: 973.656.9403; fax: 908.277.9590; e-mail:
ptkinfo@passporttoknowledge.com)

The programs will also be available on tape, approximately 2 weeks after
each broadcast.

Cost:
Broadcasts are free to educators as the result of support for PTK from NASA
and NSF. Videotapes are $19.95 including shipping/handling.

Teachers' Materials

The Multimedia Kit includes an 80-page teacher's guide, an original
full-color poster, blackline masters, student worksheets, maps, a 60-minute
teacher
resource video (modeling key hands-on activities), 35mm location slides,
sample online materials, supplementary lesson plans, assessment
materials, and more.

Cost:
MultiMedia Kit: $125, includes shipping and handling.
Teacher's Guide Pack (excludes multimedia resources
itemized above): $20, includes shipping and handling.



Website of the Week

This week's site is designed to help your students get better at images:
http://southport.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html
The JPL Radar Images site has a wide variety of images set up in an
interactive format so the students can learn how different sites appear from
space.

For another set of lessons on imaging, try:
http://ericir.syr.edu/Projects/NASA/Lessons/ls_contents.html#content

Each week, UPDATES features a different website to help you and your
students become more knowledgeable about rainforests. You should either
bookmark it in your browser or save the addresses in a word-processing file
so that they're available when you need them later on.


PTK Online Services

In addition to the weekly UPDATES, PTK also offers a listserve, or on-line
discussion group by e-mail, for educators and others planning to use the
project which allows teachers to share ideas and successes, ask questions,
discuss problems, make suggestions, etc.

To subscribe to discuss-lfrf, please send e-mail to:

listmanager@passporttoknowledge.com

(note address change from previous PTK projects!)

Place ONLY the words: subscribe discuss-lfrf

in the body of the message and that will automatically subscribe you
according to the Reply-To address embedded in your e-mail. (Be sure to turn
off your "signature", or add the word on the line after discuss-lfrf>).

If a colleague would like to subscribe to this UPDATES, follow the
directions above but put:

subscribe updates-lfrf

in the body of the message.

To be removed from the UPDATES or discuss list at any time, follow the same
instructions but type in the body of the message, for example
put either:

unsubscribe discuss-lfrf
OR
unsubscribe updates-lfrf

and you will be removed from the appropriate list.

We hope you'll continue to use UPDATES to keep abreast of PTK news and
"discuss" to let the PTK team and your colleagues know what's on your mind,
and to make suggestions about how to ensure LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST is an
exciting and worthwhile learning adventure. We know you'll enjoy traveling
with us virtually to some of the most amazing and instructive places on
Earth.







LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST Update February 19, 1998 Volume 7, Issue 11


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST Update February 19, 1998 Volume 7, Issue 11
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 22:06:17 -0700
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LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST Update February 19, 1998 Volume 7, Issue 11
--------------------------------------------


COMING ATTRACTIONS
The LFRF Preview Website
Journal of the Week: Bill Laurance
The Great LFRF "Backyard Biodiversity" Survey
LFRF Videos, Teacher's Guide and Multimedia Kit
Website of the Week
PTK Online Services

--------------------------------------------

COMING ATTRACTIONS

The LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST production crew is just back from the Amazon.
All looks good for some spectacular views, via live satellite video, and for
some unique Internet events. "Stay tuned" for more news next week! The
preview website is full of great information. Teachers are joining the
discussion of the Great Backyard Biodiversity Study . Read on for more news!


The LFRF Preview Website

Browse through the preview website at

http://passporttoknowledge.com/rainforest

and see what is already available online to help you prepare for the LFRF
project. Print out a couple of field journals for reading time. Contact a
mentor teacher to get ideas for implementation. Visit the teacher's
assessment site and take the self-assessment to determine your goals for
this project and what standards and benchmarks you hope it will help your
students achieve. Get ready to introduce your class to the rainforest using
the map activity. Still more information will be added in the coming weeks,
even before the site goes fully interactive in mid-March.


Journal of the Week: Bill Laurance

Bill Laurance is team leader of the "phytodemographic"
group, which is collecting data on the interactions of
plants, animals, insects in forest fragments, "matrix" (or
in-between) areas, and in the virgin forest. We met his
wife, Susan, in an earlier Journal, and Bill promises us
several more sets of personal anecdotes and insights before
LFRF is over! Thanks, Bill and Susan, and all the INPA/SI
researchers the PTK recently spent time with in Manaus.


A DAY IN THE AMAZON RAINFOREST

People often ask me what it's like to live in the Amazon.
That's not an easy question. I have so many impressions that
it's hard to give a simple answer.

While I spend a lot of time in the city of Manaus, home to
over a million people, I do go into the forest for several
days each month. To reach our study site, about sixty miles
north of the city, we have to drive through the rainforest
for two hours over very bumpy, muddy roads.

We see many animals as we bounce through the forest.
Macaws--big parrots--often fly overhead, screeching madly.
Sometimes we see little groups of monkeys, like
golden-handed tamarins, trying nervously to cross the road.
One day a giant anteater--eight feet long, with a massive
tail and long, protruding snout--bolted out of the forest
just in front of us, and we had to swerve to avoid hitting it.
The truck drops us off on a dirt road, then we hike for a
mile through the rainforest to reach our field camp. We
carry everything with us--food, clothes, research equipment.
The camp is primitive--just some corrugated roofing over
wooden frames to provide shelters.

In the camp, everybody sleeps in hammocks. It's hard at
first, but before long we all sleep like babies. We bathe
in a stream, and wash our clothes there, too. The food is a
little monotonous in camp--we always have rice and beans,
often supplemented with chicken or fish.

At dawn, we are woken by the deep, unearthly roar of howler
monkeys. I don't know how to describe the eerie sound they
make, but it makes the hair on the back of your neck stand
on end. It's almost like something from another planet.

You won't be surprised to hear that the weather is hot in
the Amazon. Some days it's so hot and muggy that I sweat
just sitting down, doing nothing. We have to be careful to
take a lot of water with us when we go hiking, because we
can easily lose five or six pounds of water a day just by
sweating.

Tropical rainforests contain more than half the world's
species, and sometimes it seems like most of them are
insects. Bugs are everywhere, buzzing in your face,
climbing up your legs. I've never seen so many different
kinds of ants. One biologist counted more species of ants
on a single tree in the Amazon than are known to live in all
of England!

A decade ago, when I was doing a study in Guatemala (in
Central America), a huge swarm of army ants came into our
camp. At that point, I'd spent very little time in rainforests.
I'd heard about army ants from horror movies, of course,
and I was expecting everyone to jump up screaming
and run away in fear. I was surprised, therefore, when my
colleagues calmly put away our food, grabbed a few cokes,
and casually walked a hundred yards away. "We really like
it when the army ants come," someone told me. "In a few
minutes they clean out all the mice and cockroaches, so we
have a nice clean camp after that."

I'm involved in several research projects in the rainforest.
Some days I help my wife, Susan, who is studying rainforest
birds for her Ph.D.. At other times I supervise our field
teams who are studying rainforest trees. In my next
installment, I'll tell you a little more about our research--like
the day a big jaguar decided to sharpen its claws right in front of us!

***

Next week... a Travel Log from satellite expert and Internet reporter Ann
Devereaux, who worked with PTK in the Antarctic and on PTK's first taping
trip to the Amazon!


The Great LFRF "Backyard Biodiversity" Survey

Sign up now for the major online collaborative activity planned for LIVE
FROM THE RAINFOREST. Teachers are invited to discuss the activity and its
time-line at this time and share how they plan to use the opportunity for
collaboration and real-world research this year. You can subscribe to
Discuss-LFRF and join the discussion at the website or using the procedures
listed at the end of this message.


The first part of the Survey is as follows:

Project Timeline:

February 3rd-28th: Educators response/input via DISCUSS-lfrf
March 8th: Survey Design -- Student Debate Debuts
March 30th: Survey Design Consensus Week
April 7th: LFRF Program 1: Data Gathering Begins


LFRF Videos, Teacher's Guide and Multimedia Kit

Teachers' Materials

Teachers, time to order the great Teacher's Guide, so you're on the list for
the first deliveries. This year's guide should be PTK's best so far--and
the biggest!--80 pages of standards-based activities, background information
for the teachers, blackline masters to make life easier, and lists of
resources. Each activity is keyed to one of the live programs so the whole
project flows easily and seamlessly. Teachers can pick and choose specific
activities to fit their class. There are adaptations for each lesson to
make it convenient for teachers of all different age-groups and types of
students. We recently heard from a college professor who uses the PTK
materials in his teaching! If you are unsure of how to adapt something,
contact one of the mentor teachers listed under Educators at the website.

The Multimedia Kit includes an 80-page Teacher's Guide, an original
full-color poster, blackline masters, student worksheets, maps, a 60-minute
teacher resource video (modeling key hands-on activities), 35mm location
slides, sample online materials, supplementary lesson plans, assessment
materials, and more.

Cost:

MultiMedia Kit: $125, includes shipping and handling.

Teacher's Guide Pack (excludes multimedia resources
itemized above): $20, includes shipping and handling.

LFRF consists of 3 electronic field trips to the Brazilian rainforest to be
broadcast live at 13:00 hours Eastern on April 7, 14 and 21 on participating
PBS stations and NASA-TV. Schools may also downlink and record the
telecasts directly. Contact PTK to register and receive coordinates and
current information. (Phone: 973.656.9403; fax: 908.277.9590; e-mail:
ptkinfo@passporttoknowledge.com)

The programs will also be available on tape, approximately 2 weeks after
each broadcast.

Cost:

Broadcasts are free to educators as the result of support for PTK from NASA
and NSF. Videotapes are $19.95 including shipping/handling.


Website of the Week

This week's site is

http://www.oit.itd.umich.edu/projects/ADW/

The University of Michigan Museum of Zoology's Animal Diversity Web is
absolutely wonderful. Each listed animal includes one or more photos, and
information including: Classification, Geographic Range, Physical
Characteristics, Natural History, Conservation/Biodiversity, Economic
Benefits for Humans, Other Comments and References. They are organized In
their phyla by order with scientific as well as common names listed.

Each week, UPDATES features a different website to help you and your
students become more knowledgeable about rainforests. You should either
bookmark it in your browser or save the addresses in a word-processing file
so that they're available when you need them for activities later on.


PTK Online Services

In addition to the weekly UPDATES, PTK also offers a listserve, or on-line
discussion group by e-mail, for educators and others planning to use the
project which allows teachers to share ideas and successes, ask questions,
discuss problems, make suggestions, etc.

To subscribe to discuss-lfrf, please send e-mail to:

listmanager@passporttoknowledge.com

(note address change from previous PTK projects!)

Place ONLY the words: subscribe discuss-lfrf
in the body of the message and that will automatically subscribe you
according to the Reply-To address embedded in your e-mail. (Be sure to turn
off your "signature", or add the word on the line below discuss-lfrf>).


To be removed from the UPDATES or Discuss list at any time, follow the same
instructions but type in the body of the message, for example
put either:

unsubscribe discuss-lfrf
OR
unsubscribe updates-lfrf

and you will be removed from the appropriate list.

We hope you'll continue to use UPDATES to keep abreast of PTK news and
"discuss" to let the PTK team and your colleagues know what's on your mind,
and to make suggestions about how to ensure LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST is an
exciting and worthwhile learning adventure. We know you'll enjoy traveling
with us virtually to some of the most amazing and instructive places on
Earth.