discuss-lfrf/discuss-lfrf.9802


"THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!
Date: Sun, 01 Feb 1998 15:55:59 -0500
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Welcome to "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!

Over the next several weeks we will be focusing on how to prepare for
PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE'S LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST project. To begin that
preparation I would recommend a visit to Passport to Knowledge's Evaluation
and Assessment (http://www.edc.org/CCT/ptk/ea/) web site. This site is
hosted by the Center for Children and Technology of the Education
Development Center. There are several new features, which have just been
added to the site.

For those of you who are new to PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE I would suggest that
you click on the PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE link at the very beginning of the
page. This link takes you to PTK's vision and mission. It made me realize
why I was so attracted to PTK. Their vision and mission matched many of
the beliefs I have about science education.

At the site you will find PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE'S Year Two Evaluation
Report. The focus of the report is on PTK's LIVE FROM MARS and LIVE FROM
ANTARCTICA2 projects. There is an html version actually on the site, but I
highly recommend that you download the Adobe Acrobat Portable Document. I
will warn you that it contains 124 pages of information, but it does not
take long to download. In the pdf version you will find ten case studies
of teachers who are using PTK in their classrooms. The teachers who are
documented in the case studies teach at different grade levels and brought
different levels of online experience to PTK projects. I found the case
studies fascinating. As teachers explained how they use PTK in their
classrooms I was able to pick up many helpful suggestions which I could use
with my students. What impressed me the most about the case studies was
that each situation was very different, but everyone was able to
successfully implement PTK projects and have it be a rewarding experience
for their students.

Before you leave the web site take the Self Assessment Profile. We believe
this is a first for online projects. This special section allows teachers
to reflect on their own expectations and practices about what students will
know and be able to do as a result of participating in this project. The
profile was compiled using the National Science Education Standards and the
frameworks from Illinois' Academic Standards for Science and the
Instructional Goals and Objectives for West Virginia Schools. When I took
the profile I had a copy of the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content
Standards in front of me and found that almost every standard was covered
in the profile. As you fill out the profile think about the following
questions:

Does this document make sense for your teaching goals? What is missing?

What would you like to know about how teachers in other states are thinking
about standards in relation to their teaching goals and classroom practice?

There is a discussion area on the web site to give us your feedback on the
assessment profile and assessment of student work. EDC and PTK are
providing this type of material to help you, and to help us help your
students, by demonstrating the value of innovative educational activities
such as PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE.

After you have visited this site, please share your impressions with us
online. We would like to know what you think? Did you find a close match
to the standards in your state?

CONGRATULATIONS!!!

To the Remote Sensing Public Access Center's (RSPAC) graphics design team
which will be hosting the LFRF web site--DUE TO DEBUT FEBRUARY 9TH!
The team was honored in the December issue of Graphics Design: USA
magazine, where they were named a winner of the publication's national
award for Web site design. The award is presented annually and is selected
from among the best commercial artistic entries nationwide.

The winning design was the entry page of "Our Sun," at NASA's Observatorium
web site. Visit http://observe.ivv.nasa.gov/nasa/exhibits/sun/sunframe.html
for some terrific graphics.

CONGRATULATIONS!!! to Janet Cook on her "Teacher's Incentive Bonus".

Welcome to Marty Stickle, Lani Black, Marian Shaffner, and Loretta Henke
for sending your introductions this week, and we appreciate all the helpful
suggestions discuss-lfrf members made for one of Marty Stickle's activities
for the Teacher's Guide.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov



PBS Rainforest-related broadcast


From: calderone@sysnet.net (Susan Hurstcalderone)
Subject: PBS Rainforest-related broadcast
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 23:51:52 -0500
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PBS will be broadcasting a new series "FORCES OF THE WILD" sometime
this spring. The web site for the episode on marmosets and tamarins is up
now. You will need to check your local listings for time and day of
broadcast. The story of the reintroduction of the golden lion tamarins
into the wild is a fascinating success story, one that students can see how
countries working together can help a species survive.


NATURE
"Gremlins: Faces in the Forest"
Get up close and personal with marmosets and tamarins,
tiny monkeys that call the Amazon home. Learn how
these creatures live, eat and raise families in the
rainforest canopy, and meet some of the other animals
with whom they share their home.

http://www.pbs.org/nature/

Get the VCR warmed up and ready to tape.

Susan

Susan Hurstcalderone 202/966-6682 [school]
Science Coordinatory/Teacher/Learner 202/966-4938 [school fax]
Blessed Sacrament School
5841 Chevy Chase Parkway, NW
Washington, D.C. 20015 Science.....a way of thinking.





PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE'S Spring 1998 Online Collaborative


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE'S Spring 1998 Online Collaborative
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 1998 18:18:51 -0500
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Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,

One of the high points of every PTK Module is the collaborative activity.
In past projects, students have debated which planets to target with 3
orbits of the Hubble Space Telescope, discussed how to fit a package of
scientific instruments inside a shoe-box (A challenge similar to that faced
by NASA's designers of the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft) and then monitored
weather in their own location.

In each case we have simulated the real-world research seen on camera and
read about online. This happens to be one of my students favorite parts of
PTK. I would like to invite all of you to be part of this year's LFRF
"Backyard Biodiversity" Survey.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov


PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE'S spring 1998 online Collaborative Activity -
"Backyard Biodiversity" Survey

YOU and YOUR STUDENTS are invited to become researchers in PASSPORT TO
KNOWLEDGE'S latest collaborative activity - THE LFRF "Backyard
Biodiversity" Survey.

SIMULATE the real-world research of the rainforest.

COLLABORATE with rainforest researchers as they mentor students online.

One of the unique features of PTK has become an online collaborative
activity which parallels in significant ways the real-world research of
scientists. Students use the Internet to discuss the design of an
experiment, reach consensus brokered by both PTK staff and expert mentors,
and then gather scientific data and share results online.

Beginning in March an online debate will enable students to decide exactly
how the survey will be carried out. During this design phase actual
rainforest researchers will explain to students how they themselves begin
their research and serve as mentors to help students come to a consensus
about how to conduct their survey.

Once consensus has been reached on the project design the student teams
will go outside in their neighborhoods or at other accessible sites in
their regions to record data. They will then share their data online via
the LFRF web site, where LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST will provide suggestions
and forms for visualization, and help students analyze their results.

In the final phase of the project LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST will challenge
students to a contest using the data collected by students across the
continent (and perhaps around the world). Winning entries will be
recognized online and with science prizes!

This activity will be showcased in PTK's April 21, 1998 LIVE FROM THE
RAINFOREST broadcast, "CONNECT GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY". Selected
participating classes will be shown in the broadcast.

For the rest of February, educators and the PTK development team will
finalize the logistics and the timeline on the discuss-lfrf mail-list.
Join DISCUSS-LFRF to participate and learn more about this exciting project.

To subscribe to discuss-lfrf send an email message to:
listmanager@passport.ivv.nasa.gov
and in the body of the message write:
subscribe discuss-lfrf

Or visit our all new web site http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest which
will be online February 9, 1998.

Activities:
Rainforest researchers mentor online forum
Student proposals shared online via debate-lfrf forum
Local data collection & online sharing
Data analysis and interpretation
April 21 LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST broadcast, "CONNECT GLOBALLY, ACT
LOCALLY" features select participating classes

Timeline:
February 3rd Project Announced Online
February 3rd-28th Educators response/input via discuss-lfrf
March 8th Survey Design Student Debate Debuts
March 30th A Week For Consensus
April 7th LFRF #1: Data Gathering Begins
April 21st LFRF #3: Continuing Data Gathering Showcased in Program 3
May 1st Data Posted Online
May 8th Backyard Biodiversity Challenge Posted
May 22nd Winners Announced

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





(no subject)


From: KarenMesmer
Subject: (no subject)
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 1998 19:17:48 -0600
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My name is Karen Mesmer and I teach 7th grade life science at Baraboo
Middle School in Baraboo, WI (about 40 miles NE of Madison.) This is
my first PTK project and the rainforest has been one of my interests for
years. I traveled to Belize in 1994 and to Ecuador in 1995 to visit the
rainforest and bring home some personal experiences to share with my
students. I am looking forward to collaborating on projects and
learning from scientists in the field.



Greetings -


From: LPGrant@aol.com
Subject: Greetings -
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 21:03:49 EST
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Hello! As requested, I'm introducing myself to those that are in the
Rainforest with me. My name is Loretta Grant and I am a 5/6 classroom
teacher in Westford, Vermont. It is very lovely here in Vt.... but winter
seems long. (Though I am presently involved with an Antarctica project so I
don't feel I have much room for complaint in the weather department!!) This
is my first PTK project and I look forward to it greatly. We, the classroom
study, will be moving toward South America in a couple of months so I thought
this would fit nicely with the scheduled curriculum. I would very, very much
like to travel to the rain forest - especially Belize someday. Another dream
is to spend time in Patagonia. All in good time I suppose. Looking forward to
visiting cybernetically anyway!



LFRF Resources Needed


From: donna maranville
Subject: LFRF Resources Needed
Date: Fri, 6 Feb 1998 15:51:57 -0600 (CST)
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Dear LFRF Discussion,
Eileen was asking for books on the RainForest about two weeks
ago, F.Y.I., I would like to share with you a project that teachers may be
interested in that applies to the Rain Forest. The University of
Nebraska State Museum, with a grant from the Howard Hughs Medical
Institute has developed 5 interactive kits that feature female
scientists. The kits are geared for grades 4-6. One of the goals of the
project was to encourage girls to enjoy science by providing female role
models (also broadens the boys perspective). One of those kits is on
Janalee Caldwell, PhD. She works on the ecology of tropical amphibians.
The kit is entitled Rainforest Ecologist. One of the projects is
concerned with the life cycle of poison frogs from Amozonian Brazil.
Janalee is a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. The kits include
a videotape of research done on site by Nebraska ETV (which is
excellent), a CD-Rom, activity guide and biography plus other items that
are not available in the classroom.
The kits have been very successful with schools, teachers and
students here in NE.
Information is available through GPN, a service agency of the
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is the producer and distributor of the
Emmy award-winning series, Reading Rainbow.
Their address is P.O. Box 80669
Lincoln, NE 68501-0669,
Call toll-free 1-800-228-4630
E-mail gpn@unlinfo.unl.edu
Visit the Web site at:
http://gpn.unl.edu

You can request a brochure by contacting GPN or myself at the signature
address below.
Donna
##############################################################################
Donna Maranville
NASA Educator Resource Center
University of Nebraska State Museum
135 Morrill Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0374
Voice: 402/472-4525
Fax: 402/472-8899
Email: dmaranvi@unlinfo.unl.edu





Introduction


From: Mary Logsdon
Subject: Introduction
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 1998 20:46:31 -0600
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Hello to fellow Live From the Rainforest participants,

I have a class of 22 fourth graders. In the past I have participated in
the Live from Antarctica project, Live from the Stratosphere, Live From the
Hubble, and Live from Mars. All of the projects grabbed the interest of
the students. The teachers guide was an excellent resource and so were the
web resources. I was able to choose the activities that were most
appropriate for my students. We are looking forward to being involved with
the Live from the Rainforest project.

Mary



====================================================================
Mary Logsdon mlogsdon@lps.org
Teacher Fourth Grade
Eastridge Elementary
6245 L Street
Lincoln, NE 68510






PTK Travels


From: Marilyn Weiser
Subject: PTK Travels
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 14:56:49 -0600 (CST)
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Greetings from ND,
I teach 4th grade in Minot, ND, which is in the northwestern part of the
state. My students and I began our PTK travels with Live From Antarctica
1. The boys and girls have e-mailed scientists, done many hands-on
projects, combined art, geography, language, math and watched the Live
From...tapes of Antarctica, the stratoshpere and Mars. We are looking
forward to the rainforest!
Since our summer in Washington DC, my 'advocacy' role has spread to
state technology workshops, as well as local in-services. I will be
presenting the PTK and Quest stories at the ND State Science Teacher's
meeting here in Minot in March.
Marilyn Weiser




"THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"
Date: Sun, 08 Feb 1998 20:59:31 -0500
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Welcome to "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!

The place to visit this week is the new PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE LIVE FROM THE
RAINFOREST web site (http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest). The preview
version will be online in the next couple of days, but we will continue to
add things to the site throughout the month, as well as, throughout the
project.

During the month of February we will add to the main sections of the site.
GEOsystem, ECOsystem, TEAMS and INTERACT will be populated by the plants,
animals, and people of the rainforest.

For those of you who have recently joined DISCUSS-LFRF you will find the
archives of our list online. Take a moment to visit and read some of the
introductions from teachers who are both new to PTK and our PTK veterans.

Under the EDUCATORS heading you will find a list of mentors who can help
you implement the LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST project successfully, no matter
whether you teach in elementary, middle or high school, or at home; and
whether you're a science specialist, a team teacher with interdisciplinary
interests, or even someone responsible for ESL or adult literacy.

Members of the PTK team are off to the rainforest this weekend to finalize
the broadcast plans for LFRF. You can read the journal of our Project
Director, Geoffrey Haines-Stiles, from his December trip to the rainforest
in last week's updates.

We have been very busy planning an exciting spring for both you and your
students. LFRF will have the distinctive PTK mix of video, hands-on and
online. I posted the description of our main collaborative project to the
list last week. If you did not receive a copy please contact me and I
would be happy to send you one. Besides the main collaborative activity we
are also planning mini-collaborative activities. For more about what is
planned stay tuned to next week's UPDATES-LFRF and "THIS WEEK".

I would like to welcome Karen Mesmer, Loretta Grant, Mary Logsdon, and
Marilyn Weiser who sent their introductions this week.

Have a great week and let us know what you think about our new web site.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





intro


From: pealatere
Subject: intro
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 1998 19:52:32 -0800 (PST)
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Intro of self for LFRF project:

Jacki Pealatere, teacher of 7th grade science in northern California.
First-time PTK participant, I'd like to have my class compare/contrast flora
and fauna between our areas.



intro


From: "Richard A. Kurnik"
Subject: intro
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 07:31:39 -0500 (EST)
Back to top




Intro of self for LFRF project:

Jacki Pealatere, teacher of 7th grade science in northern California.
First-time PTK participant, I'd like to have my class compare/contrast flora
and fauna between our areas.


Re: intro


From: gdexter@humboldt.k12.ca.us (Ginny Dexter)
Subject: Re: intro
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 1998 11:27:52 -0800 (PST)
Back to top



HI JACKIE,
I am also in Northern California (Just outside of Eureka). What
part are you in? thanks, Ginny

At 7:31 AM 2/9/98, Richard A. Kurnik wrote:
>Intro of self for LFRF project:
>
>Jacki Pealatere, teacher of 7th grade science in northern California.
>First-time PTK participant, I'd like to have my class compare/contrast flora
>and fauna between our areas.





The Web Site is Online!


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: The Web Site is Online!
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 17:45:58 -0500
Back to top



Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,

I just wanted to let you know that the web site is online. You can visit
it at (http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest/intro.html). Under the
educators section you will find three of the activities from the Teacher's
Guide.

Let us know what you think.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov







Awesome Sight!


From: "Marilyn K. Wall"
Subject: Awesome Sight!
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 98 21:05:21 -0500
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LFRFers.....

Wow! Awesome!

I just checked out the LFRF web site!

Incredible pictures reflecting the richness of the rainforest! After five
days of being housebound by snow and sleet the green foliage truly does
seem to shine like emeralds.

Layout and design are well thought out and the links allow you to go back
and forth between pages without having to return the the "home page"...(
as we had to in LFA2)

Congratulations PTK team!

Can't wait to get started!

Marilyn Wall
here inthe Shenandoah Valley
Today was our first day back to school since Tuesday! The kids think they
have been
on permanent holiday since Christmas! Haven't had a full week of school
in 1998!



Plants in the news


From: Jim Wenzloff
Subject: Plants in the news
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 07:52:41 -0500
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Last evening (2/9/98) the CBS Evening News did a feature on the use of
plant in developing new drugs for medical use. The tease at the end of the
feature indicated that tonight's feature would be on plants found in the
Rainforest that are used in medicine.

One interesting thing was stated in last nights feature was that 25% of the
newest drugs on the market, legal of course, came from plants and that 50%
of drugs used to fight cancer came from plants

jim
Jim Wenzloff
Passport to Knowledge Advocate
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov






Drugs from the Rainforest


From: Tim McCollum
Subject: Drugs from the Rainforest
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 09:50:05 +0000
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Hi PTK'ers,

Regarding Jim Wenzloff's mention of this week's CBS Evening News
feature, there is a wonderful book available which traces one such
scientist's work in this area. Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice by Dr.
Mark Plotkin ( 1993, Penguin Books ) follows an ethnobotanist as he
searchs for new medicines in the Amazon rainforest. You may remember Dr.
Plotkin as the subject of one of Bill Kurtis's New Explorer series - A
Twentieth Century Medicine Man. Not intended for the students but good
reading for teachers preparing for LFRF. Also, don't forget the great
video - Medicine Man staring Sean Conery.

Tim McCollum
Charleston Middle School
Charleston, IL



URL for Web Site


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: URL for Web Site
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 19:58:27 -0500
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Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,

The correct URL for the web site is http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest
I should not have included the additional part in yesterday's message to
the list.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





Re: URL for Web Site


From: Ginny
Subject: Re: URL for Web Site
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 21:28:02 -0500
Back to top



Hi,
When I go to the website I get a message that says Java Script
Error - Line 74 and line73 undetermined string literal. I've never had
that message before. Are some of the lesson plans up for us to preview?
I'm not sure why I am having problems. Thanks, Ginny

At 7:58 PM -0500 2/10/98, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:
>Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,
>
>The correct URL for the web site is http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest
>I should not have included the additional part in yesterday's message to
>the list.
>
>Eileen Bendixsen
>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov







Re: URL for Web Site


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Re: URL for Web Site
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 21:39:18 -0500
Back to top



Ginny,

Did you use the new URL? What browser and what version are you running? I
will pass your error message on to see if I can find out what is the problem?

Yes, three of the lesson plans are online. One is an opening activity, the
next one is an outside data collection activity which may be a small
collaborative activity for teachers who want more of the online component,
and another activity which will lead into a Food Web Game we have planned.

Thanks,

Eileen

At 09:25 PM 2/10/98 -0501, Ginny wrote:
>Hi,
> When I go to the website I get a message that says Java Script
>Error - Line 74 and line73 undetermined string literal. I've never had
>that message before. Are some of the lesson plans up for us to preview?
>I'm not sure why I am having problems. Thanks, Ginny
>
>At 7:58 PM -0500 2/10/98, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:
>>Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,
>>
>>The correct URL for the web site is http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest
>>I should not have included the additional part in yesterday's message to
>>the list.
>>
>>Eileen Bendixsen
>>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
>> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>
>
>
>
>
>



preview site


From: "Wilma Haataja"
Subject: preview site
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 98 09:49:00 -0500
Back to top




I just checked the preview site. It looks awesome! I also had an
error message and lost my connection. Hope to get back there soon.
When are the classroom materials going to be mailed? I would love to
have them very soon! Thanks

Wilma Haataja







Re: URL for Web Site


From: gdexter@humboldt.k12.ca.us (Ginny Dexter)
Subject: Re: URL for Web Site
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 11:23:46 -0800 (PST)
Back to top



I can get the web site at school. At home I am using Netscape 2.0, and it
is not coming up correctly. At schoolI am on a hub and am using Netscape
3.01. thanks, ginny

At 9:39 PM 2/10/98, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:
>Ginny,
>
>Did you use the new URL? What browser and what version are you running? I
>will pass your error message on to see if I can find out what is the problem?
>
>Yes, three of the lesson plans are online. One is an opening activity, the
>next one is an outside data collection activity which may be a small
>collaborative activity for teachers who want more of the online component,
>and another activity which will lead into a Food Web Game we have planned.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Eileen
>
>At 09:25 PM 2/10/98 -0501, Ginny wrote:
>>Hi,
>> When I go to the website I get a message that says Java Script
>>Error - Line 74 and line73 undetermined string literal. I've never had
>>that message before. Are some of the lesson plans up for us to preview?
>>I'm not sure why I am having problems. Thanks, Ginny
>>
>>At 7:58 PM -0500 2/10/98, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:
>>>Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,
>>>
>>>The correct URL for the web site is http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest
>>>I should not have included the additional part in yesterday's message to
>>>the list.
>>>
>>>Eileen Bendixsen
>>>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>>>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
>>> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>





Fwd: URL for Web Site


From: LoreyH717@aol.com
Subject: Fwd: URL for Web Site
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 18:20:35 EST
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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By the way, when I got into the new Rain forest web site last night, I was
overwhelmed and immediately sent in $20 for the teacher's guide as the lesson
plans are fabulous. I could not print the lesson plans nor could I print the
form to order the guide so I just sent the check in with my address with a
request for the guide.


I'd also like to mention a PBS video I taped on Saturday (New York Channel 13)

It's called Gremlins: Faces in the Forest
and it centers on marmoset monkeys in a Rain Forest in Brazil. It's l hr.
long and a wonderful introduction to Rain Forest study. It clearly shows the
beauty of the RF and the life within. I've put the web site below for you so
you can learn more about this wonderful video. I've already shown it to my
3rd and 4th grade class and they loved it as I did. They want to see it
again!

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/gremlins/html/home.html
or click on below if you can.
NATURE:
Gremlins: Faces in the Forest



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Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 11:23:46 -0800 (PST)
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Message-Id:
To: Eileen Bendixsen , Ginny ,
discuss-lfrf@passport.ivv.nasa.gov


Re: URL for Web Site


From: LoreyH717@aol.com
Subject: Re: URL for Web Site
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 18:20:35 EST
Back to top



I can get the web site at school. At home I am using Netscape 2.0, and it
is not coming up correctly. At schoolI am on a hub and am using Netscape
3.01. thanks, ginny

At 9:39 PM 2/10/98, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:
>Ginny,
>
>Did you use the new URL? What browser and what version are you running? I
>will pass your error message on to see if I can find out what is the problem?
>
>Yes, three of the lesson plans are online. One is an opening activity, the
>next one is an outside data collection activity which may be a small
>collaborative activity for teachers who want more of the online component,
>and another activity which will lead into a Food Web Game we have planned.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Eileen
>
>At 09:25 PM 2/10/98 -0501, Ginny wrote:
>>Hi,
>> When I go to the website I get a message that says Java Script
>>Error - Line 74 and line73 undetermined string literal. I've never had
>>that message before. Are some of the lesson plans up for us to preview?
>>I'm not sure why I am having problems. Thanks, Ginny
>>
>>At 7:58 PM -0500 2/10/98, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:
>>>Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,
>>>
>>>The correct URL for the web site is http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest
>>>I should not have included the additional part in yesterday's message to
>>>the list.
>>>
>>>Eileen Bendixsen
>>>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>>>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
>>> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>



--part0_887239235_boundary--



Re: Printing Out the Lesson Plans


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Re: Printing Out the Lesson Plans
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 22:03:50 -0500
Back to top



Loretta,

When you tried to print the lessons from the web site did it tell you that
there were no pages to print? I have found that if I try to print it a
second time that it will often go through and print. If you still have
trouble printing out the lesson plans on the site you can copy them from
the web site and then paste them into a word processing program.

I find that transferring the lesson into a word processing allows me to put
the lesson in the familiar lab format that I use with my students and I can
also make whatever changes I need to make.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





Web site


From: Gianfranco Martinis
Subject: Web site
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 05:41:40 GMT
Back to top



I have checked the web site, and it's awesome.
I enjoy very much seen those pages, they are very well done.
I haven't any problem, I use Netscape 4.04, and everithing was OK.
Congratulations for all of you, who made possible this awesome site to learn
and enjoy.

Best wishes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gianfranco Martinis
cpces04@salnet.com.ar
Belgrano High School
4400 Salta - Argentina




Web site


From: Lynn Hammonds
Subject: Web site
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 1998 12:07:14 -0800 (PST)
Back to top



Hello from Ms. Hammonds' third grade class at Rancho Santa Fe Elementary
School in Rancho Santa Fe, California. We are a K-8 school with an
enrollment of about 680, and the only school in our district of Rancho
Santa Fe. There are five third grades, with a maximum of twenty students
each. The village of Rancho Santa Fe is nestled into the hills of San
Diego County about 10 miles inland from the Pacific Ocean. It is a small
community which provides an enormous amount of support for our school by
means of state of the art facilities, parental involvement, and
curriculum enrichment.

Our class is composed of thirteen boys and seven girls. Some of the
special projects we are currently working on are a Native American
project, multiplication of "eights", gardening, and setting up our own
class web site. We will be working with research partners in Honolulu,
Hawaii, and are looking forward to incorporating CUSeeMe technology into
our Live From the Rain Forest unit. We have already visited the "virtual
rain forest" on the web.

Personally, I have enjoyed a former PTK series on the Hubble with my class
when I taught in Honolulu, and was a participant in the NEWEST program in
1995 at AMES.

We look forward to the project and interacting with other schools. You
may email us at:

Teacher issues:

lynnh@rsf.k12.ca.us


Student topics:

room7@rsf.k12.ca.us


Looking forward to working with you,

Lynn Hammonds







introduction


From: "Mike Reynolds"
Subject: introduction
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 98 11:02:32 -0500
Back to top




My name is Mike Reynolds and I teach 7th grade science at a private
school for boys in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. My classes and I
participated in the Live From Mars program and found it to be a
terrific way to learn about space exploration, Mars and even our own
environment here on Earth. I have one computer in my classroom which
we use most of the time to communicate with the adults and students
involved in PTK interactive programs. My students especially like
writing to other students through the program. We have enjoyed
various web-chats, video programs and laboratory activities sponsored
by PTK.

If you are a person who has subscribed to this list and are just
reading through the mail with thoughts of joining the activities I
would encourage you to join in. I got started last year with very
little experience with the internet and interactive, collaborative
type projects. The other more experienced teachers were a great deal
of help as I tried to get started. This is a very friendly group of
professionals who make it easy for those of us who are less computer
savvy to get started. So take the plunge.

I try to carve out one to two days per week for activities and
projects associated with this program. My students get very involved
and do much of the work outside of class. For the most part I just
have to coordinate their efforts. They choose what they want to do as
a class and I just provide materials, encouragement and a little
guidance here and there.

I am looking forward to the collaborative project. I hope that we can
get our students talking. They generate some interesting ideas this
way. I look forward to working with all of you.

Mike Reynolds





project introduction


From: "Mike Reynolds"
Subject: project introduction
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 98 14:20:02 -0500
Back to top




We are kicking off the Live From the Rainforest project by watching
the National Geographic video "Rain Forest". It is 60 minutes long
and was produced in 1983 but well worth the time. It describes a
great many organisms found in the rain forest in Costa Rica. My 7th
graders really enjoy the film, it is perfect for this age. After
introducing all of these creatures and describing their unique
relationships with one another the film ends by describing how fast
the rain forests are being cut down. It is an eye opening ending and
a great conversation starter.


Mike Reynolds
Cranbrook Kingswood MS





project introduction


From: Barbara Ryan
Subject: project introduction
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 15:10:43 -0500
Back to top



Hi Everyone,
My name is Barbara Ryan and I am a seventh grade science teacher at Dolan
Middle School in Stamford, Ct. We are an innercity school of about 900
students in 6th,7th and 8th grades. I teach about 100 students at various
learning levels
from the gifted program to an inclusion model special ed group.
I have used the PTK programs before and my students and I have really
enjoyed them. Last year we worked on the Antartica 2 and loved it.
I look forward to working with others and getting some new and innovative
ideas on how to implement this program in my classroom. I will enjoy hearing
from anyone out there. Barbara :.)




Re: URL for Web Site


From: gdexter@humboldt.k12.ca.us (Ginny Dexter)
Subject: Re: URL for Web Site
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 1998 15:46:53 -0800 (PST)
Back to top






Re: URL for Web Site


From: gdexter@humboldt.k12.ca.us (Ginny Dexter)
Subject: Re: URL for Web Site
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 18:11:40 EST
Back to top



Hi: I downloaded a new browser and I got into the site last night but today I
couldn't and I called American On Line and they checked the site and could not
get in either.

So......many people may be trying to get on at the same time or maybe because
it's a new site, there may be trouble.

Loretta Henke





Happy San Valentin's Day


From: Gianfranco Martinis
Subject: Happy San Valentin's Day
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 22:49:32 GMT
Back to top



Happy Valentin's Day to all of you!.

Best wishes in this very special day.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------=
----
Gianfranco Martinis
cpces04@salnet.com.ar
Belgrano High School
4400 Salta - Argentina




Re: The Web Site is Online!


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: Re: The Web Site is Online!
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 08:36:50 -0700
Back to top



It's a wonderful site, but remember, this is just the "Preview Site," sort
of like the beta-version of a new program. There are still things being
changed and added, but it's basically the site. So, please, now's the time
to make suggestions for improvements and additions, etc. Thanks!

Janet K. Cook
Sinclair Middle School
300 W. Chenango
Englewood, CO 80110
(303) 781-7817 (w) (303)806-2000 x1904 (vm)
-----Original Message-----


The Web Site is Online!


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: The Web Site is Online!
Date: Saturday, February 14, 1998 3:55 AM
Back to top




>Dear Discuss-lfrf Members,
>
>I just wanted to let you know that the web site is online. You can visit
>it at (http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest/intro.html). Under the
>educators section you will find three of the activities from the Teacher's
>Guide.
>
>Let us know what you think.
>
>Eileen Bendixsen
>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>
>
>
>
>
>







Eye Safety During Solar Eclipse


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Eye Safety During Solar Eclipse
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 21:00:43 -0500
Back to top



The Sun can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief
seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse. Partial eclipses, annular
eclipses, and the partial phases of total eclipses are never safe to watch
without taking special precautions. Even when 99% of the Sun's surface is
obscured during the partial phases of a total eclipse, the remaining
photospheric crescent is intensely bright and cannot be viewed safely
without eye protection.

Visit http://planets.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/safety.html for more information
about eye safety and sources where you can get filters.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov




Eclipse URLs


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Eclipse URLs
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 21:00:25 -0500
Back to top



I thought you might be interested in some URLs for the eclipse. Some of
these were sent by Charlie Lindgren and I've added some of my own. If
anyone knows of some other great sites please post them to the list.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov


Fred Espenak's great Eclipse Home Page from the NASA Goddard Laboratory for
Extraterrestrial Physics. There is plenty of eclipse information at this
site including information about past and future eclipses.

http://planets.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/eclipse.html

Eclipses for Students and Beginners
This site is part of the Home Page above, but it has great background
information and pictures for students.

http://planets.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEnovice.html

Eclipse quips: Test your knowledge
Solar eclipses are surrounded by millennia of scientific and cultural lore.


How well do you know the facts and the legends? Answer the following quiz,
then click on the button to see how well you did.

http://www.msnbc.com/modules/quizzes/eclipse.asp

Moonstruck
The Western Hemisphere's last total solar eclipse of the millennium will
happen Feb. 26. The map shows universal time, the scientific standard for
astronomical events. Click on a location to see the effect of the solar
eclipse at local time in selected cities.

http://www.msnbc.com/modules/eclipse/default.asp

How to view a solar eclipse safely
Observing the sun directly - even during a partial eclipse - can cause
permanent eye damage. Damage to the eyes comes predominantly from invisible
infrared wavelengths, so the fact that you feel no discomfort while gazing
at a partial eclipse does not guarantee that your eyes are safe. Here are
some techniques for watching the Feb. 26 solar eclipse safely.

http://www.msnbc.com/news/133180.asp

View the NASA NetShow clip of the July 11, 1991 solar eclipse and hear the
reaction of eclipse wathchers.

http://www.msnbc.com/news/video/100/eclipse1.asx

Encarta Sites:

Latitude, Longitude, and Universal Time
http://encarta.msn.com/alexandria/templates/lessonFull.asp?page=1255
Students use a globe to estimate the latitude and longitude of their city
and a table of time zones to convert between local time and Universal Time.

How Do Eclipses Occur?
http://encarta.msn.com/alexandria/templates/lessonFull.asp?page=1256
Students demonstrate solar and lunar eclipses using a lamp, a ball and a
globe to represent the sun, moon and earth.

Measuring the Sun with a Simple Sun Projector
http://encarta.msn.com/alexandria/templates/lessonFull.asp?page=1257
Using a small hand mirror, students construct a "sun projector" that
reflects an image of the sun into a darkened room. They use their projector
to measure the diameter of the sun and track the progress of a solar
eclipse.

Observing the Solar Eclipse of 1998
http://encarta.msn.com/alexandria/templates/lessonFull.asp?page=1258
Students use a Sun Projector to make observations of a solar eclipse on
February 26, 1998. By sharing their data with students around the world,
they estimate the path of totality and compare their results with onsite
observations.

Eclipse Data Analysis
http://encarta.msn.com/alexandria/templates/lessonFull.asp?page=1332
Using worldwide student observations of the Solar Eclipse of 1998, students
develop predictions about eclipses and compare their results with those of
professional astronomers.







ECLIPSE!


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: ECLIPSE!
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 21:00:48 -0500
Back to top



NASA, the Exploratorium and Discover Online are sponsoring a Live @ The
Exploratorium (no connection to PTK/Live From ...) event for the solar
eclipse.


NASA'S SUN-EARTH CONNECTION EDUCATION FORUM,
THE EXPLORATORIUM, & DISCOVERY ONLINE PRESENT:

LIVE @ THE EXPLORATORIUM: SOLAR ECLIPSE:
Stories From The Path Of Totality

On February 26th, a total solar eclipse will occur across the Southern
Caribbean. On February 25th and 26th, an expedition of NASA's Sun-Earth
Connection Education Forum (SECEF), the Exploratorium, and Discovery Online
will be stationed along the path of totality, sharing live images of the
eclipse with museum visitors and an Internet audience through Live @ The
Exploratorium. Scientists from Stanford and UC Berkeley will highlight
NASA's cutting-edge solar research and images. The Sun-Earth Connection
Education Forum, a joint partnership of UC Berkeley's Space Sciences
Laboratory (SSL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, is
hosting the event.

THE WEBCASTS
------------

We will be producing two live Webcasts around the eclipse: one the night
before, Wednesday, February 25th at 7:00pm to 9:00pm (PST), and one during
the eclipse, Thursday, February 26th 9:00am - 11:00am (PST). Both Webcasts
will switch between the Webcast Studio on the floor of the Exploratorium
and the expedition team on Aruba, an island in the Caribbean. Check the
Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum Website at:

http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov

Each Webcast will feature interviews with NASA Sun-Earth Connection
Scientists, discussions and demonstrations of the science that happens
during an eclipse, and will include questions and interaction with the
audience in the Exploratorium and over the Internet.

Wednesday's Webcast will be presented in conjunction with Discovery
Online's Discovery Live!, hosted by Neal Conan. Exploratorium scientists
will give a brief explanation of the eclipse. Todd Hoeksema from Stanford
University's Solar Oscillation Investigation (SOI) group, and Bob Lin from
UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory will then discuss current & future
research on the Sun. In addition, we will interview David Dearborn, a
stellar physicist and archaeoastronomer in Aruba, children who have
witnessed a previous solar eclipse, and the technology specialists in Aruba
who will explain the technology behind the live Webcasts.

The Exploratorium's Zane Vella, who is a teacher and is the Live@ Producer,
will moderate Thursday's Webcast of the actual eclipse. Phil Scherrer, a
solar physicist who directs the research of the SOI group will share about
the current research on the Sun. Janet Luhmann, a space scientist at UC
Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory, will discuss how the active Sun
affects the Earth's environment. Together with the Exploratorium scientists
and crew in Aruba, we will explore the science, research and history of
eclipses and the Sun's corona. (The corona becomes visible during an
eclipse, and is the subject of much of the current research.)

TO ATTEND THE WEBCAST AT THE EXPLORATORIUM
------------------------------------------

In order to be a member of the Studio audience, simply come to the
Exploratorium. There is no special admission to join the Webcast -- only
the normal Exploratorium admission prices apply:

FREE to Members and Children under 3
Adults: $9.00
Seniors: $7.00
Students (w/ID): $7.00
People with disabilities: $5.00
Youth (6-17): $5.00
Children (3-5): $2.50

The Exploratorium is located in the landmark Palace of Fine Arts building
in San Francisco's Marina District, just off Highway 101 near the Golden
Gate Bridge. Ample free parking is available. For directions, please call
our directions line: 415/561-0399. We will open at 9:00am on Thursday,
February 26th for the Eclipse Webcast.

TO ATTEND THE WEBCAST OVER THE INTERNET
---------------------------------------

In order to view the live video and audio, and to interact with others in
the chat rooms, you will need an Internet connection of 28.8 Kbps or
better, and will need to be running either Microsoft Explorer 3.0 or
better, or Netscape 2.0 or better. If you are running a PC you should be
ready to participate. With Macintosh, you will need to download RealAudio
in order to hear the action as well as see it. To get any of this
software, follow the appropriate links from:

http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse

In addition to the live action, the eclipse website will also be a resource
for information on eclipses, including activities, science, and articles on
the historical significance of eclipses.

For more information on the schedule, the participants, or the
partnerships, go to:

http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
----------------

We wish to thank NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center team for providing and
supporting the unique satellite link between Aruba and the San Francisco
Exploratorium. Thanks to NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)
for generously providing live solar data. We gratefully acknowledge the
NASA Sun-Earth Connection scientists for providing scientific expertise for
the event. This event is supported in part by NASA's Sun-Earth Connection
Education Forum under Cooperative Agreement #NCC5-253.





Solar Eclipse February 26


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Solar Eclipse February 26
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 1998 21:00:10 -0500
Back to top



Dear discuss-lfrf members,

As I'm sure many of you know there will be a total eclipse of the sun on
February 26th. Charles Lindgren is sponsoring a terrific project involving
the collecting of data on the day of the eclipse. He has 34 schools
participating. At this point I don't think Charlie can add any more
schools, but if anyone would like to participate I would be willing to
collect the data and put all the data into a table for everyone. Charlie
is also traveling to Guadeloupe to view the eclipse first hand.

You can visit his web page for the project at:
http://www.ssec.org/idis/gate/ecl.htm

For a live video the day of the eclipse visit:
http://www.excelsoft.com/eclipse/staiger/david/simple.html

What are your plans for the eclipse? Please share any ideas or resources
you have with the list.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov




Web Site URL


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Web Site URL
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 1998 09:18:48 -0500
Back to top



Dear discuss-lfrf members,

I just want to remind everyone to use the
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest address and not the longer one that
was attached to Janet's message to the list.

Thanks,

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





NASA Invites Kids to Send Their Names to Mars


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: NASA Invites Kids to Send Their Names to Mars
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 1998 10:04:19 -0500
Back to top



NASA Invites Kids to Send Their Names to Mars

On December 3, 1999 the Mars Polar Lander will enter the Martian atmosphere
and it will rendevous with the planet's surface at a predetermined spot
within 500 miles of the Martian south pole.

NASA invites you to be a part of this historic event. The goal is to
collect 1 million names of school children from around the world, and
combine these names on a CD-ROM that is going to be included in the payload
of the Mars Polar Lander.

Visit http://spacekids.hq.nasa.gov/mars/home.htm for more information.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov




"THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 1998 22:31:02 -0500
Back to top



Welcome to "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!

One of the high points of every PTK Module is the collaborative activity
which parallels in significant ways the real-world research seen on camera
and read about online. Many of us still talk about The Great Planet Debate
from LIVE FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE. During LIVE FROM MARS we
debated what tools to place inside a shoe-box for data collection on Earth
which simulated the decisions NASA's designers faced with the Mars
Pathfinder spacecraft.

The collaborative activity for LFRF will be the LFRF "Backyard
Biodiversity" Survey. Beginning in March an online debate will enable
students to decide exactly how the survey will be carried out. Once
consensus has been reached on the project design and the procedures to be
followed the student teams will go outside in their neighborhoods or at
other accessible sites in their regions to record data. In the final phase
LFRF will challenge students to a contest using the data collected by
students across the continent (and perhaps around the world). Winning
entries will be recognized online and with science prizes!

During the next week we would like to hear from you about the plans for the
collaborative activity. We need your feedback in particular about the
timeline. Once the timeline is set we will stick to it, so let us know if
you forsee a problem due to your spring break, testing, or end of your
school year. Does the timeline meet your needs? Will you still be in
school for the May 22 winning announcement? What are some of the things
you have learned from data collection activities in the past? Is there
anything that you feel will not work in your classroom? What suggestions
do you have for other teachers about how to get their students involved in
the beginning discussions?

Timeline:
February 3rd Project Announced Online
February 3rd-28th Educators response/input via discuss-lfrf
March 8th Survey Design Student Debate Debuts
March 30th A Week For Consensus
April 7th LFRF #1: Data Gathering Begins
April 21st LFRF #3: Continuing Data Gathering Showcased in Program 3
May 1st Data Posted Online
May 8th Backyard Biodiversity Challenge Posted
May 22nd Winners Announced

If you have not had a chance to visit the new web site
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov/rainforest we hope you will visit this week
and let us know what you think. I also recommend that you visit the
PTK/EDC evaluation site http://www.edc.org/CCT/ptk/ea/ and take the self
assessment profile as we prepare for our exciting journey to the rainforest.

Welcome to Jacki Pealatere, Lynn Hammonds, Mike Reynolds, and Barbara Ryan
who posted introductions this week.

Have a great week!

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





LTC Programs on International Space Station


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: LTC Programs on International Space Station
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 13:45:57 -0500
Back to top



The Learning Technologies Channel has two programs in February about the
International Space Station, how it works and will be used for research.

After each event you will have an opportunity to join in a web chat with a
Space Station specialist.

Visit http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/ltc/schedule.html to learn more about these
events.

Thursday, February 19:
"Countdown To Launch"
9:30 am - 11:00 am Pacific (12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Eastern)

Give your students an inside look at the International Space Station
project and fire their interest in math, science and engineering!

Targeted to middle and high school students, this interactive telecast
suppports a broad range of educational goals. Students will learn about
careers in scientific and technical fields and be able to talk to the
people who are making the International Space Station a reality.

Featured topics will include:
the lates robotic inventions
research in space about the human body
studies in microgravity that may lead to new medical therapies on Earth
the way space suits work


Thursday, February 26:
"Open For Business"
10:00 am - 12:00 pm Pacific (1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Eastern)

Everyone interested in Space Station research plans are invited to
participate in this event!

You'll hear about progress in current life and microgravity science
research. You'll also follow the story of an research and development
company that is planning to use the Space Station to develop new commercial
products. A diverse panel of top NASA and commercial researchers,


international investors and other experts will answer questions.





Warm-up Activity? Well, except it's snowing here in CO


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: Warm-up Activity? Well, except it's snowing here in CO
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 11:53:55 -0700
Back to top



http://birdsource.cornell.edu/Great'98/index.html
Cornell University and the National Audubon society are sponsoring an online
bird count Feb. 20-22. I thought this might be a way to introduce the idea
of the Backyard Biodiversity activity to our kids. At least we can get them
noticing that there are organisms out there and they are important. People
are encouraged to count and report birds seen that weekend. They will post
the results. You have until March 1st to report, so kids shouldn't think
they have to report from home. Anyway, check out the site if you're
interested. I'll be doing it from home just because I enjoy birding (which
is why I went to the rainforest to start with--see the birds!) Good
birding! janet
PS This is my own idea, not a PTK sponsored activity








Schools near Boston


From: "Mike Reynolds"
Subject: Schools near Boston
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 98 14:25:37 -0500
Back to top




Are any of you from the Boston area planning to do Live From the
Rainforest? I will be traveling to Boston in May with several of my
students and perhaps we could get our students together while in town.

Mike





NASA TV Coverage of the Eclipse


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: NASA TV Coverage of the Eclipse
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 1998 17:53:14 -0500
Back to top



Dear discuss-lfrf members,

For those of you who have access to NASA TV here is another way to view the
eclipse on February 26.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov


NASA OUTLINES PLANS TO STUDY FEB. 26 TOTAL ECLIPSE

The Feb. 26 total eclipse will be visible from a narrow
corridor which begins in the Pacific, continues through the
Caribbean and ends off the Atlantic coast of Africa. Much of
the south and eastern U.S. will see a partial eclipse.

NASA's plans to study the eclipse include:

* Researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center,
Greenbelt, MD, will be among international teams of scientists
who will observe the eclipse from Curacao, Guadeloupe, and
Aruba, using solar telescopes to analyze the structure and
magnetic activity of the Sun's corona. Scientists are
available to discuss the upcoming solar eclipse. Contact Bill
Steigerwald, Goddard Public Affairs Office, 301/286-8955 (see
note below for live interviews on NASA TV).

* The NASA/European Space Agency's (ESA) Solar and
Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft will assist eclipse
expeditions from around the world by making simultaneous
observations during the eclipse that will reveal a more
complete picture of what is occurring on the Sun. Contact Bill
Steigerwald, Goddard Public Affairs Office, 301/286-8955.

* The NASA/ESA Ulysses spacecraft, now in polar orbit
around the Sun, will give scientists a "birds-eye view" of huge
loops of solar material tearing away from the Sun's corona.
These ejections of solar mass can be seen from ground-based
observatories during solar eclipses, but Ulysses' orbit above
the Sun's poles gives scientists another perspective from which
to better understand these potentially dangerous storms.
Ulysses scientists are available for interviews about the
upcoming solar eclipse by contacting Diane Ainsworth in the
Media Relations Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
Pasadena, CA, 818/354-5011.


NASA TV plans the following:

* An eclipse preview Video File will run on NASA-TV
several times in February. Elements in the Video File include
animation showing the path of the eclipse, some safe eclipse
viewing tips, and examples of how scientists use 'artificial'
eclipses to study the Sun's corona.

* NASA will offer live interviews with Art Poland of the
SOHO team. Dr. Poland will give eclipse viewing tips & fun
facts and explain how scientists use artificial eclipses to
continuously monitor the Sun's corona. The Live Shots are
scheduled the evening of Feb. 25 and the morning of Feb. 26.
Contact Wade Sisler, Goddard Space Flight Center, 301/286-6256.

* A time-lapse movie of the moon's shadow as it sweeps
across the Earth will be taken by the GOES satellite during the
four-hour event. If the images can be processed in time, NASA
TV will broadcast a special edition of the Video File around 4-
5 p.m. EST.

NASA Television is available through the GE-2 satellite,
transponder 9C located at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical
polarization, with a frequency of 3880 MHz, and audio at 6.8 MHz.





Brunei Rainforest


From: Gayle Remisch
Subject: Brunei Rainforest
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 1998 19:13:02 -0500
Back to top



This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Here's more from EARTHWATCH

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/NH_Zoo_Magnet/earthwatch/brunei_rainforest.html

Gayle Remisch
Banyan Tree School

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SRC"gifs/earthwatch.gif" ALIGN="LEFT" WIDTH="108" HEIGHT="108">
SRC="gifs/earthwatch.gif" ALIGN="RIGHT" WIDTH="108" HEIGHT="108">

Brunei's Rainforest Canopy


Kuala Belalong Field Studies Center, Brunei


Principal Investigator:


Roger Kitching


Griffith University, Australia

Team II: July 1-11, 1997


Dianah Marr


Palisades High School


Grades 9 and 10


OBJECTIVES:


After completing this lesson students should be able to:



  1. use research techniques to design an effective specimen collecting
    device.

  2. classify insects to the order level

  3. express and explain their research findings in a graph and paragraph
    form.

MATERIALS NEEDED



     Key for insects
- 1 per student
      petrie dishes
- 1 per student
      ethanol

     dissecting microscopes



      forceps - 1 per student

      small storage vials (aprox. 20 ml)
with caps - 10-15 per student
      labels
for the vials
      insect design
worksheet
      daily research
journal worksheet
      insect
tally worksheets
      data table
worksheet


BACKGROUND INFORMATION:



      Tropical
rainforests can be found in the tropics of South America,
Africa, or
South East Asia. The rainfall in these areas generally exceeds 2,000

mm
per year and where there is little or no seasonal water shortage. These

forests are evergreen and usually more than 30 m tall. Epiphytes and climbing

plants are characteristic of all rainforests.. Although the composition of the

plants and animals that make up the forests vary from one continent to

another, the way the forests function and are structured is similar. The
rainforests around the world are important elements to our global
society because they act as air filters and conservation mechanisms for soil and water.

Tropical rainforests depend on the continuous warm weather, sunlight,
and
wet climate. The plants compete for these resources and those that

compete the best will survive. The abundance of plants adds to the available

resources for other organisms further along the food chain in the rainforest.

The resources provided by the large variety of plants supports an even greater

diversity of animal life. Biodiversity refers to the collective group of all
life
forms in a particular place. The biodiversity in the rainforest is
an invaluable
resource for medicines, food and learning. In terms of
species richness, insects
are the most abundant in diversity and
population. Insects dominate all land
environments.


      It is estimated that there are
about 30 million species of insects in the
world. So far scientists have
only discovered a fraction of the insects that
exist. Insects are so
adaptable and can become so specialized that they may
exist only in one
tree in the rainforest. In that instance, the insect is completely

dependent on the tree for survival. If that tree is forested for timber, the

species becomes extinct.
      ;
Concerned scientists around the world are ambitiously trying to study

and assess the biodiversity of the rainforest ecosystems through the study of

insects. To make any sense of the information that is collected, it must be

compared to studies of another environment. If we can compare the data

collected in the rainforest to the data we collect somewhere else, we can draw

our own conclusions about the biodiversity of the rainforest environments.




PROCEDURES:




  1.   Review the elements
    of a rainforest, biodiversity, classification with the

      students.

  2.   Have students
    research the local environment in which they live (where

      they will be doing there specimen collecting)


  3.   Students design a
    trap that they will construct to capture their specific


      type of insect

  4.   Students setup their
    traps to collect specimens and insect samples are
     
    brought into class the next day to be sorted

  5.   Students keep a journal of every step in their research process at home


      and in class

  6.   Collect samples for
    at least 5 days. It may be necessary to set out the
     
    traps every other day so students have a reasonable amount of time to

      sort their samples

  7.   Make sure students
    label their samples appropriately, especially with
     
    their name and the date


  1.   When 5 days of data are
    collected, students should summarize the

      information in a data table (see worksheet)


  2.   Students write a summary
    of the information that they collected and

      state their findings. They should compare their
    data to the data collected

      by Dr. Kitching. What kind of similarities or
    differences are observed?
      What are some
    possible reasons why?

  3.   Have students design a
    cover page and bibliography and turn in their

      report


EVALUATION:




  1.   Have students evaluate themselves each day: What could have been done

     
    better? What was done well? What needs to be focused on tomorrow?

      What grade
    do I deserve for the work I did today?

  2.   Design a rubric for
    grading each part of the assignment

  3.   Allow student creativity or hard work be incorporated as a separate


      grade

CONCLUSIONS:



      This
project is designed for students to develop a sense for the process
of
scientific discovery. It is modeled after actual research methods that I

participated in on my Earthwatch Expedition. It incorporates higher order

thinking skills like synthesis, evaluation, assessment, and application The

project taps the imagination and creativity within the student and it gives
the
student a sense of ownership and autonomy in their academics.


EXTRA CREDIT:



Present the trap designs to the class


Present the final report with a visual aid to the class



Back to Lessons Index




Mail Comments or suggestions to Barry E. Shapiro at: bshapiro@lausd.k12.ca.us



--------------3131353565DB--




Rainforest URL's from EARTHWATCH


From: Gayle Remisch
Subject: Rainforest URL's from EARTHWATCH
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 1998 19:30:46 -0500
Back to top



Lesson Plans and other interesting materials from EARTHWATCH
Volunteers go to unusual places to assist in the work.

Excellent local biodiversity project and ecology connection.

Ontario's Ancient Forests
http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/NH_Zoo_Magnet/earthwatch/ontario_ancient_forest.html


Brunei Rainforest
http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/NH_Zoo_Magnet/earthwatch/brunei_rainforest.html

DODGE FOUNDATION TEACHERS IN THE RAIN FOREST
http://www.earthwatch.org/ed/sponsors/dodge.html


Gayle Remisch
Banyan Tree School
PTK Canadian Agent, Outreach Advocate, and Smart Filter



Amazon KATYDIDS -


From: Gayle Remisch
Subject: Amazon KATYDIDS -
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 1998 19:49:47 -0500
Back to top



EARTHWATCH project of the month

http://www.earthwatch.org/ed/pm/nickle.html

Katydids form a major element in the food web of the Amazonian Rain
Forest, yet according to Dr. David Nickle, Earthwatch Principal
Investigator and entolmologist at the Smithsonian, surprisingly little
is known about their behavior.


Sounds of the Rain Forest

Field Notes and Drawings

Teacher-Developed Lessons
http://www.earthwatch.org/ed/pm/lessons.html
Tropical Rain Forest Katydid Capers
Katydid Creations
Katydid Diversity and Population Density
Physics Lab Project: Design an Insect Catcher
Rain Forest Museum and Arthropod Menagerie
Trading with the Yagua Indians: A Simulation
Making Rain Forest Items: Fast and Easy.

Teacher/Student Developed Web Site, "An Amazon Adventure"
http://168.216.210.13/amazon/


Gayle Remisch
Banyan Tree School
PTK Canadian Agent



Journal of the Week: Marty Stickle


From: LoreyH717@aol.com
Subject: Journal of the Week: Marty Stickle
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 1998 23:33:10 EST
Back to top



I loved reading Marty's journal. What an adventure. I'm returning to school
on Monday after being on winter break this week and I'm definitely turning
this journal into a lesson for Monday. What a wonderful experience for my
students! I actually felt like I was in the rainforest with them and I know
my students will also.

I particularly loved when the squirrel monkeys surrounded them trying to
protect their territory. It was fabulous. What a wonderful way for my
students to learn about the rainforest!

Thanks from me and my students. I'm sure they are going to ask me if I can
take them to Costa Rica!

Loretta Henke



new to PK


From: "Ed & Kelly Billington"
Subject: new to PK
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 08:41:46 -0800
Back to top



Hello,
I was cruising the net looking for info on the rain forest when I came
across this site. I'm unsure whether it is suitable for my 2-3 grade class
or not, it sounds quite a bit over their heads. I do however like the
possibility of having some very real up to date information. Our small
private school is located in the foothills of the Cascades in Snoqualmie,
Washington. Can you help with more specific info?

Thanks,
Kelly







Re: new to PTK


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Re: new to PTK
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 23:31:15 -0500
Back to top



Hi Kelly,

Passport to Knowledge Modules are aimed at the middle school level, but
they are very adaptable to all grade levels. We have had classes
participate in PTK projects from primary to the college level. In fact
Kelly, one of the main purposes of this list is to help teachers implement
PTK in their classroom successfully. You will find that we have teachers
at all grade levels on this list willing to help you.

Our spring project, LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST, is a unit that is taught in
many grade levels which makes this project even more adaptable. Three of
the activities from the Teacher's Guide can be found at the web site. A
Day in the Life is definitely adaptable to a second grade level. One
Square Meter is another activity you could use. You might not take out all
of the equipment listed in the materials section, but you could collect
your insects etc. in jars. Instead of using the pins and wood blocks for
mounting your specimen, you could use the small bug boxes that are
available from science catalogues for your specimen and glue them to a
display board. The larger insects such as butterflies could be placed in
sandwich bags and glued to the board. Using very simple field guides have
the students write the name of their organism under the bug box. My
daughter used this method to display her insect collection last year for
her final project for AP Bio. The teacher kept her project it came out so
well. Even Rivers, Maps and Math could be adapted. I am a firm believer
in teaching map skills to students and it is never too early to start.

The Teacher's Guide for the project will be out in the next couple of
weeks. We will also have a Multimedia Kit which will contain a teacher
resource video to show you how to do some of the activities in the Guide,
as well as other resources. There is a form for ordering these materials
under the Educators section of our web site. During the next few weeks and
throughout the project our web site will be populated by the plants,
animals, and people of the rainforest. So I encourage to visit the site
often and use it as a resource with your students. We will also be posting
student work from all grade levels at the site.

I teach seventh graders and have not taught second grade since I did my
student teaching (I'm not going to say how long ago that was.), but I'm
sure the primary teachers who are part of this list will have some great
suggestions as to how they adapt PTK Modules for their students. We also
have two primary teachers who are veterans of PTK projects who would be
willing to mentor you through the project. One of the best things about
PTK is the support you will find from the teachers on the discuss list.
You will always find someone here to help.

Welcome to discuss-lfrf and we hope you join us for an exciting trip to the
rainforest in April. Our project director, Geoff Haines-Stiles, has just
returned from Brazil where they finalized the plans for the LIVE broadcasts
which will be part of the project. I am sure that he will have an update
on the project for us in the near future.


Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov



At 08:41 AM 2/19/98 -0800, you wrote:
>Hello,
>I was cruising the net looking for info on the rain forest when I came
>across this site. I'm unsure whether it is suitable for my 2-3 grade class
>or not, it sounds quite a bit over their heads. I do however like the
>possibility of having some very real up to date information. Our small
>private school is located in the foothills of the Cascades in Snoqualmie,
>Washington. Can you help with more specific info?
>
>Thanks,
>Kelly
>
>
>
>
>
>




LFRF timeline


From: "Mike Reynolds"
Subject: LFRF timeline
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 98 11:25:08 -0500
Back to top




I think the timeline will be fine for us. Our students will be away
on spring break from March 21 - April 6. I am setting aside lots of
time for the students to work on the project in early March so that we
can participate in the survey design phase. We will miss the
consensus week and that is all right with us. We hope to have
provided our input by then and we will follow the design plan when we
return. We should have no problem collecting data or participating in
the challenge at the end.

Mike Reynolds
Cranbrook Kingswood MS




Mars Workshop


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Mars Workshop
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 19:25:58 -0500
Back to top



NASA's Learning Technology Channel is hosting a Mars Teachers' Workshop
Tuesday, February 24 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., PST (1-4 p.m., EST). The
workshop will be conducted LIVE from NASA's Ames Research Center in
Mountain View, CA. and will consist of a lecture on the latest findings
about Mars, a Web chat with a Mars expert and a walking tour of facilities
at Ames devoted to Mars research.

The one-hour lecture will begin at 10 a.m., PST and will be available on
Real Audio, Real Video, CU-SeeMe and MBONE. A Mars expert will be


answering your questions during an hour-long Web chat from 11 a.m.-noon.
The final hour of the workshop (noon to 1 p.m) will be devoted to a
walking tour of Ames that you can follow on Real Audio, Real Video,
CU-SeeMe and MBONE.

For additional details go to: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/ltc/mars/workshop1

Join us for another exciting LIVE Learning Technologies Channel event!







Re: new to PTK


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: Re: new to PTK
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 22:29:20 -0700
Back to top



Dear Kelly, I have used several PTK projects with my own kids, now ages 5 &
8. They love them. Just cut out the complicated stuff and focus in on the
things they can do.

About the bugs, my daughter mounts her insects on the Styrofoam trays you
get from the butcher. We run them through the dishwasher, then use short
pins or glue for mounting. When she's satisfied with that group, we cover
it over with clear plastic wrap. We probably had a dozen of them scattered
around the house last summer!

Enjoy the project! Your kids will love it.


Janet K. Cook
Sinclair Middle School
300 W. Chenango
Englewood, CO 80110
(303) 781-7817 (w) (303)806-2000 x1904 (vm)


>Hi Kelly,
>
>Passport to Knowledge Modules are aimed at the middle school level, but
>they are very adaptable to all grade levels. We have had classes
>participate in PTK projects from primary to the college level. In fact
>Kelly, one of the main purposes of this list is to help teachers implement
>PTK in their classroom successfully. You will find that we have teachers
>at all grade levels on this list willing to help you.
>
>Our spring project, LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST, is a unit that is taught in
>many grade levels which makes this project even more adaptable. Three of
>the activities from the Teacher's Guide can be found at the web site. A
>Day in the Life is definitely adaptable to a second grade level. One
>Square Meter is another activity you could use. You might not take out all
>of the equipment listed in the materials section, but you could collect
>your insects etc. in jars. Instead of using the pins and wood blocks for
>mounting your specimen, you could use the small bug boxes that are
>available from science catalogues for your specimen and glue them to a
>display board. The larger insects such as butterflies could be placed in
>sandwich bags and glued to the board. Using very simple field guides have
>the students write the name of their organism under the bug box. My
>daughter used this method to display her insect collection last year for
>her final project for AP Bio. The teacher kept her project it came out so
>well. Even Rivers, Maps and Math could be adapted. I am a firm believer
>in teaching map skills to students and it is never too early to start.
>
>The Teacher's Guide for the project will be out in the next couple of
>weeks. We will also have a Multimedia Kit which will contain a teacher
>resource video to show you how to do some of the activities in the Guide,
>as well as other resources. There is a form for ordering these materials
>under the Educators section of our web site. During the next few weeks and
>throughout the project our web site will be populated by the plants,
>animals, and people of the rainforest. So I encourage to visit the site
>often and use it as a resource with your students. We will also be posting
>student work from all grade levels at the site.
>
>I teach seventh graders and have not taught second grade since I did my
>student teaching (I'm not going to say how long ago that was.), but I'm
>sure the primary teachers who are part of this list will have some great
>suggestions as to how they adapt PTK Modules for their students. We also
>have two primary teachers who are veterans of PTK projects who would be
>willing to mentor you through the project. One of the best things about
>PTK is the support you will find from the teachers on the discuss list.
>You will always find someone here to help.
>
>Welcome to discuss-lfrf and we hope you join us for an exciting trip to the
>rainforest in April. Our project director, Geoff Haines-Stiles, has just
>returned from Brazil where they finalized the plans for the LIVE broadcasts
>which will be part of the project. I am sure that he will have an update
>on the project for us in the near future.
>
>
>Eileen Bendixsen
>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>
>
>
>At 08:41 AM 2/19/98 -0800, you wrote:
>>Hello,
>>I was cruising the net looking for info on the rain forest when I came
>>across this site. I'm unsure whether it is suitable for my 2-3 grade class
>>or not, it sounds quite a bit over their heads. I do however like the
>>possibility of having some very real up to date information. Our small
>>private school is located in the foothills of the Cascades in Snoqualmie,
>>Washington. Can you help with more specific info?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>Kelly
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>






discoveryeclipse site


From: LoreyH717@aol.com
Subject: discoveryeclipse site
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 1998 22:20:02 EST
Back to top



This site is interesting.

http://www.discovery.com/area/science/eclipse/eclipse.html




"THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 1998 20:32:15 -0500
Back to top



Welcome to "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!

There was great excitement at Beers Street Middle School last week. Erna
and the video crew came to tape one of the activities in the Teacher's
Guide. Twenty-five seventh graders participated in The Tropical Rainforest
Food Web Game. One student represented the sun and the others were plants
or animals you would find in a tropical rainforest. Each of the organisms
was researched to find out who they were and what connections they had with
other organisms in the rainforest. The students then formed several
circles. The student representing the sun stood in the middle as the
source of energy in the food web. The plants and trees formed the next
ring as producers, and the animals formed the next two rings to represent
different levels of consumers. As each student explained who they were and
their connections to the other organisms in the rainforest they picked up
different colored pieces of yarn to represent those connections. While our
web continued to build and the students were able to visualize the
importance of each organism to the entire web we observed other things
building as well. A student who was new to Beers Street and was having
difficulty adjusting came out of his shell and very clearly explained who
he was and his connections. Other students who had been hesitant in the
past showed maturity I had not seen previously.

At the end of the taping we reflected on how the food web has been taught
in the past - through discussion, reading out of a book, or diagrams - and
how much more the students learned by doing this activity. I left my first
teaching position after three months because I was being directed by the
principal to teach science by reading out of a twenty-two year-old science
book. She did not approve of the hands-on science program I was putting
together. Why do you put in all of the time and effort it takes to do
hands-on science? Do you have any special PTK moments? How has using PTK
Modules changed how you teach every day?

Let's hear from you. Some of your experiences may help inspire another
teacher.

***

Don't forget to order your copy of the LFRF Teacher's Guide or the
MulitMedia Kit. I have included a copy of the order form below.

The LFRF MultiMedia Kit contains an 80-page teacher's guide, an original
full-color poster, blackline masters, student worksheets, maps, a 60-minute
teacher resource video (modeling key hands-on activities), 35mm location
slides, sample online materials, supplementary lesson plans, assessment
materials, and more.

Cost:

MultiMedia Kit: $125, includes shipping and handling.

Teacher's Guide Pack (excludes multimedia resources itemized above):
$20, includes shipping and handling.


Order Form:

First Name:

Last Name:

School Name:

Mailing Address:

Street:


City: State:

Zip Code:

Daytime contact phone number:

E-mail:

Enter the Number of MultiMedia Kits, @ $125.00 each:

Enter the Number of Teacher's Guide Packs, @ $20.00 each:

Payment Information:

Passport to Knowledge will accept school purchase orders or checks made
payable to Passport to Knowledge (we are unable to accept credit card
payments).

Please mail payment to:
PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE
P.O. Box 1502
Summit, NJ 07902-1502

You may also fax to: (908) 277-9590

If paying by purchase order, append (if by fax) or attach copy.

Welcome to Susan Hurstcalderone who sent her introduction this week.

Have a great week!

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov





Re: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: Re: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 1998 19:28:42 -0700
Back to top



I remember last year doing a unit on Antarctica. There was an activity
called the "Blubber Glove" in which the kids put a bunch of shortening in a
plastic bag and stuck one hand in that and sealed it up. The other hand
they just stuck in the bag and sealed with no air in it. Then they had to
immerse both hands in freezing ice water. NONE of the boys would do it!
The girls in each group did it and they were amazed how much longer they
could keep the "blubber" hand in the water than the plain hand. All the
reading in the world about how whales and other aquatic mammals have layers
of blubber wouldn't have made the same impact as this simple 20 minute lab.
janet




Janet K. Cook
Sinclair Middle School
300 W. Chenango
Englewood, CO 80110
(303) 781-7817 (w) (303)806-2000 x1904 (vm)
-----Original Message-----


"THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!
Date: Sunday, February 22, 1998 6:50 PM
Back to top




>Welcome to "THIS WEEK" IN "LIVE FROM THE RAINFOREST"!!!
>
>There was great excitement at Beers Street Middle School last week. Erna
>and the video crew came to tape one of the activities in the Teacher's
>Guide. Twenty-five seventh graders participated in The Tropical Rainforest
>Food Web Game. One student represented the sun and the others were plants
>or animals you would find in a tropical rainforest. Each of the organisms
>was researched to find out who they were and what connections they had with
>other organisms in the rainforest. The students then formed several
>circles. The student representing the sun stood in the middle as the
>source of energy in the food web. The plants and trees formed the next
>ring as producers, and the animals formed the next two rings to represent
>different levels of consumers. As each student explained who they were and
>their connections to the other organisms in the rainforest they picked up
>different colored pieces of yarn to represent those connections. While our
>web continued to build and the students were able to visualize the
>importance of each organism to the entire web we observed other things
>building as well. A student who was new to Beers Street and was having
>difficulty adjusting came out of his shell and very clearly explained who
>he was and his connections. Other students who had been hesitant in the
>past showed maturity I had not seen previously.
>
>At the end of the taping we reflected on how the food web has been taught
>in the past - through discussion, reading out of a book, or diagrams - and
>how much more the students learned by doing this activity. I left my first
>teaching position after three months because I was being directed by the
>principal to teach science by reading out of a twenty-two year-old science
>book. She did not approve of the hands-on science program I was putting
>together. Why do you put in all of the time and effort it takes to do
>hands-on science? Do you have any special PTK moments? How has using PTK
>Modules changed how you teach every day?
>
>Let's hear from you. Some of your experiences may help inspire another
>teacher.
>
>***
>
>Don't forget to order your copy of the LFRF Teacher's Guide or the
>MulitMedia Kit. I have included a copy of the order form below.
>
>The LFRF MultiMedia Kit contains an 80-page teacher's guide, an original
>full-color poster, blackline masters, student worksheets, maps, a 60-minute
>teacher resource video (modeling key hands-on activities), 35mm location
>slides, sample online materials, supplementary lesson plans, assessment
>materials, and more.
>
>Cost:
>
>MultiMedia Kit: $125, includes shipping and handling.
>
>Teacher's Guide Pack (excludes multimedia resources itemized above):
> $20, includes shipping and handling.
>
>
>Order Form:
>
>First Name:
>
>Last Name:
>
>School Name:
>
>Mailing Address:
>
>Street:
>
>
>City: State:
>
>Zip Code:
>
>Daytime contact phone number:
>
>E-mail:
>
>Enter the Number of MultiMedia Kits, @ $125.00 each:
>
>Enter the Number of Teacher's Guide Packs, @ $20.00 each:
>
>Payment Information:
>
>Passport to Knowledge will accept school purchase orders or checks made
>payable to Passport to Knowledge (we are unable to accept credit card
>payments).
>
>Please mail payment to:
> PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE
> P.O. Box 1502
> Summit, NJ 07902-1502
>
>You may also fax to: (908) 277-9590
>
>If paying by purchase order, append (if by fax) or attach copy.
>
>Welcome to Susan Hurstcalderone who sent her introduction this week.
>
>Have a great week!
>
>Eileen Bendixsen
>Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
>For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>
>
>






Video


From: "Wilma Haataja"
Subject: Video
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 98 08:32:35 -0500
Back to top




Hi everyone! I had the best time this weekend checking videos on the
rainforest, in order to introduce the program to my students, and I
found a wonderful one: "Amazonia: A celebration of life". Its running
time is 23 minutes (perfect to fit in a class period). I checked the
video out at my local library. It belongs to the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation collection, which supports programs
on World Environment Research. The distributor is:
Leapin' Lemur Productions
125 West 76th. St. Suite 6B
New York, N.Y. 10023
I could not find a phone number.
I also rummaged around my old National Geographic Magazine collection
and found a wonderful section on the Amazon in the October 1972 issue,
and a section on the rainforest canopy on the issue of December 1991.
These articles gave many ideas to present the topic to my kids in a
way that will make them excited about it. I hope this will help
someone who is just as new as me, at PTK.
By the way, the proposed timeline looks good for us.
Hope all of you have a good week!

Wilma Haataja
Cranbrook-Kingswood Girls' Middle School






class intro


From: garman@pop.life.uiuc.edu (Nancy Garman)
Subject: class intro
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 1998 14:29:37 -0600
Back to top



Hi!
My name is Nancy Garman and I teach 5th grade math and science in
Charleston, IL. Live from the Rainforest participation was written into a
Tech. Challenge grant that our school received from the state. There are
12 classes from our building that should be involved - but we're not sure
at what level we will be participating. We're hoping Tim McCollum from our
middle school will give us some guidance. I have been minimally involved
in Live from the Stratosphere and Live from Mars. We are currently
finishing a plant unit in which we grew and designed experiments with
Wisconsin Fast Plants. Rainforest Researchers from Tom Snyder Productions
seems to be a wonderful close to our plant unit and be a great introduction
to a rainforest project. We will start Rainforest Researchers later this
week after the students have presented their plant projects. So - I'm
looking forward to being involved - just not sure at what level.
Nancy





Spacelink Celebrates It's 10th Anniversary


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Spacelink Celebrates It's 10th Anniversary
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 1998 17:29:18 -0500
Back to top



Dear discuss-lfrf members,

Many of you have been involved with Spacelink for several years and I
thought you might be interested in this announcement.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov


Please join us in celebrating NASA Spacelink's 10th anniversary by
visiting the special Spacelink anniversary pages that commemorate a
decade of service to the educational community. We are also interested
in hearing of your Spacelink experiences. How did you discover
Spacelink? How have you and your students benefitted from Spacelink?
How has Spacelink enhanced your instruction? We also invite you to take
a fun trip down memory lane with the Nostalgia Timeline that highlights
how Spacelink, computers, and telecommunications have changed over the
past ten years.

Go to the Spacelink home page and click on the anniversary page link:

http://spacelink.nasa.gov







Re: class intro


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: Re: class intro
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 1998 20:01:46 -0700
Back to top



Dear Nancy, Welcome aboard. Please let us know how Rainforest Researchers
works. I looked at it in the catalog and was considering purchasing it.
I'd love to hear how your kids like it. I teach sixth grade math and social
studies. janet



Janet K. Cook
Sinclair Middle School
300 W. Chenango
Englewood, CO 80110
(303) 781-7817 (w) (303)806-2000 x1904 (vm)
-----Original Message-----


class intro


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: class intro
Date: Monday, February 23, 1998 1:38 PM
Back to top




>Hi!
>My name is Nancy Garman and I teach 5th grade math and science in
>Charleston, IL. Live from the Rainforest participation was written into a
>Tech. Challenge grant that our school received from the state. There are
>12 classes from our building that should be involved - but we're not sure
>at what level we will be participating. We're hoping Tim McCollum from our
>middle school will give us some guidance. I have been minimally involved
>in Live from the Stratosphere and Live from Mars. We are currently
>finishing a plant unit in which we grew and designed experiments with
>Wisconsin Fast Plants. Rainforest Researchers from Tom Snyder Productions
>seems to be a wonderful close to our plant unit and be a great introduction
>to a rainforest project. We will start Rainforest Researchers later this
>week after the students have presented their plant projects. So - I'm
>looking forward to being involved - just not sure at what level.
>Nancy
>
>
>






Mentors and meanderings


From: KDPW49B@prodigy.com (MRS RHONDA B TOON)
Subject: Mentors and meanderings
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 1998 22:41:59, -0500
Back to top



-- [ From: Rhonda Toon * EMC.Ver #2.5.3 ] --

Hi all,

Thought I'd jump in here also. I, too, was contacted about remaining a
mentor after the Live From Mars project and agreed. I met many people
via the mentor page and it was always fun to share information about PTK
to newcomers. The PTK experience has been one sharing opportunity after
another! I am more than happy to address LFRF issues, particularly the
use in elementary classrooms, the use with one computer, and now the
implementation through a science center.

While the growth for my students was always evident, I think on a
personal level, I have experienced the same growth in collaborating with
teachers across the country.

I have fond memories of the hand immersion/blubber experience as well.In
my classroom both boys and girls were eager to do it and I had lots of
moms and dads comment about it later. It was definitely discussed around
kitchen tables!

I think one of my favorites with LFM was the PET activity. There was a
lot of dialogue and debate throughout that project and with my third
graders it expanded beyond our classroom in multiple ways. We ended up
going to a local high school class for some of the materials and on the
actual day of the data collection, had a high school student who came
along. The inquiry that came out of that event was tremendous. Kids got
into exploring all kinds of variables. There were so many jumping off
points that expanded the study past the event itself. I don't think we
took a single field trip after that last year that the kids didn't
insist on taking PET type data. It became sort of a standard protocol to
inquire about temperature, wind direction, etc.

When you see your students engaged and asking questions and seeking
answers without any directive from you as the teacher you know you have
the environment you seek in the classroom. PTK has always been great at
providing that kind of experience--kind of like having this unseen
teaching partner. Not a tangible person but a purpose for all of this
technology!

Are there any other subscribers who are in a science center setting? I
am planning a staff development class on LFRF. The center is sponsoring
a trip to Costa Rica in late June and there is a lot of interest in this
electronic field trip as a pre-event to the actual teacher trip. Several
schools in my area have multiple teachers who will be going to Central
America this summer.

One other suggestion to consider as you are looking for extension
activities in the classroom is to contact college faculty in your area.
I just got in from a workshop a university entomologist did at the
center for me. It was excellent. He brought in all the material. Very
hands-on. Very inquiry-based. During LFA i copntacted the community
college and it just so happens one of the science teachers there was an
expert in nematodes. You may remember that nematodes were discussed in
LFA so she came out with microscopes and slides and did a fantastic job
of extending what we had learned from LFA. It also helped the kids to
formulate much better questions of the LFA researchers they had daily
access to via the Internet because they went off on their own
researching after the speaker's visit.

Rhonda





another rainforest resource


From: garman@pop.life.uiuc.edu (Nancy Garman)
Subject: another rainforest resource
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 15:15:40 -0600
Back to top



Classroom Connect has a terrific resource out. Trouble is, I received it
as part of a subscription. Volume 2 Issue 6 of lesson.plan.net is
Rainforest. It's 50 pgs. full of cross-curricular lessons/activities with
appropriate links.
Again, though, it's 1 issue of a subscription. Does anyone have any
contacts at Classroom Connect that might allow LFRFers purchase this 1
issue? The subscription, as I recall was about $100 for 9 issues - but
well worth the cost.

Nancy
P.S. What happened to winter - it's 65 degrees and sunny here in Central Il.!!!
Thank you, El Nino - wherever you are!





Amazon Adventure 1997


From: Laura Vermeer
Subject: Amazon Adventure 1997
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 16:33:30 -0600
Back to top



Hello lfrf members,

Our librarian just sent me an e-mail with the following site address.
It looks pretty good and I don't believe its been mentioned before. It
is the Amazon Adventure for 1997 by Earthwatch and the site was
constructed by one Andrew Mercer from Wellington, New Zealand.

By the way, we also use the National Geographic Video, The Rainforest,
that was mentioned earlier and we love it too.

Try this site: http://vif27.icair.iac.org.nz/toc.htm

Laura Vermeer




introduction


From: Tes Camp
Subject: introduction
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 17:36:31 -0600
Back to top



Hi!
My name is Tes Camp and I teach fourth grade at Fisher Grade School in
Fisher, Illinois. I have been doing a rainforest unit with my fourth
graders for the past five years and it is always a big hit! I have used the
Tom Synder, "Rainforest Researchers" software the past two years. It is a
great program and the students love it. We turn the classroom into a
rainforest by creating trees with carpet tubes covered with brown paper
bags and leaves made out of large green construction paper. I've made
stands using large coffee cans with a stick embedded in concrete. The
groups I make for the Rainforest Researchers program all sit together with
their desks in a circle around their tree. I found an audio tape from The
Relaxation Company, Inc. at a local bookstore that is actual Rain Forest
sounds recorded in Costa Rica. I do many activities with this unit from
creative writing, acrostic poetry, rain forest animal reports, to making
rain sticks! (using wrapping paper tubes, gutter guard, and rice) This year
we also made a Power Point slide show using different parts of our
rainforest unit. Our sixth grade science teacher, who has participated in
Live From Mars sent me the information about Live From the Rainforest. I
have visited the site and it looks great! Even though we are about the
finish our unit my class is interested in participating in LFRF.
I will also include our school home page address for any of you out there
who have or are in the process of creating one. We just got ours up and on
the web this year and we still have some areas to complete!
http://www.fisher.k12.il.us




Intro.


From: calderone@sysnet.net (Susan Hurstcalderone)
Subject: Intro.
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 19:35:19 -0500
Back to top



Hello to fellow Live From the Rainforest participants,
I just realized that I never properly introduced myself to this
group. I teach middle school science in Washington, DC. In the past my
students have participated in the Live from Antarctica I and II and Live
from Mars. I'm using LFRF with my sixth graders where I will tie it in with
"The
Second Voyage of the Mimi". Is there anyone else out there using these two
projects together? My sixth grade students are looking forward to being
involved with LFRF because they have heard and seen so much of what
happened when my older classes were involved with PTK projects.
I look forward to another exciting adventure. I especially enjoy
the online component that connects us and never leaves you isolated in the
classroom. My only regret is that we will be on spring break for one of
the broadcasts, but you bet that the VCR will be up and running full speed
for that one.
Susan

Susan Hurstcalderone 202/966-6682 [school]
Science Coordinatory/Teacher/Learner 202/966-4938 [school fax]
Blessed Sacrament School
5841 Chevy Chase Parkway, NW
Washington, D.C. 20015 Science.....a way of thinking.





March NASA-TV Schedule - Rebroadcast of PTK programs


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: March NASA-TV Schedule - Rebroadcast of PTK programs
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 23:30:21 -0500
Back to top



Dear discuss-lfrf members,

The March schedule for NASA TV can be found online at:

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/NASA.News/NASA.Television.Schedules/Education.Sche
dule/.index.html

Included in the schedule for March is the rebroadcast of Program 1 "Oceans,
Ice and Life" from LIVE FROM ANTARCTICA 2, and Program 5 "Today on Mars"
from LIVE FROM MARS.

NASA's Education programs are broadcast weekdays at 2-3 p.m. (Eastern
Standard or Daylight Time), with replays at 5-6 p.m., 8-9 p.m., 11 p.m.-12
a.m., and 2-3 a.m. the next morning. NASA TV is available by satellite on
GE-2, Transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical polarization,
with a frequency of 3880 Mhz, and audio of 6.8 Mhz

*************************************************************************

MAR 13 Fri.

Live From Antarctica 2: "Oceans, Ice & Life"
(rebroadcast of live performance)
Target: Grades 5-8
Length: 60:00
Guide: On-line, see Internet site
Internet: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/antarctica2/main/o_msg.html

Come aboard the R.V. Polar Duke and sail across the Drake Passage, some of
the roughest waters on earth, to Antarctica's Palmer Station. Meet
researchers who are studying the interaction of the marine food chain, and
see how ocean life changes with the seasonal ice sheets. This program
demonstrates the adaptation of life to such extreme conditions, and shows
how scientists must also adapt their lives and research techniques to the
environment.
________________________________________________________________________

MAR 19 Thur.

Live From Mars Program V: "Today on Mars..."
(rebroadcast of live performance)
Target: Grades K-12
Length: 60:00
Guide: On-line, see Internet site
Internet: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/mars

Live From Mars Program V presents live weather data and imagery from Mars,
showing what has been learned from the Pathfinder lander and rover. This
continuing data provides students with material to analyze in math and
computer classes. The video shares what Sojourner has revealed about the
actual composition of Martian rocks, and what this implies for the question
of liquid water and the possibility of life. The video also gives a preview
of the next decade of exploration.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov




Re: NASA TV Coverage of the Eclipse


From: donna maranville
Subject: Re: NASA TV Coverage of the Eclipse
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 08:46:17 -0600 (CST)
Back to top




Is NASA going to compile the best materials from the TV Coverage of the
Eclipse into a video?

Donna
##############################################################################
Donna Maranville
NASA Educator Resource Center
University of Nebraska State Museum
135 Morrill Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0374
Voice: 402/472-4525
Fax: 402/472-8899
Email: dmaranvi@unlinfo.unl.edu


On Wed, 18 Feb 1998, Eileen Bendixsen wrote:

> Dear discuss-lfrf members,
>
> For those of you who have access to NASA TV here is another way to view the
> eclipse on February 26.
>
> Eileen Bendixsen
> Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
> For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
> http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov
>
>
> NASA OUTLINES PLANS TO STUDY FEB. 26 TOTAL ECLIPSE
>
> The Feb. 26 total eclipse will be visible from a narrow
> corridor which begins in the Pacific, continues through the
> Caribbean and ends off the Atlantic coast of Africa. Much of
> the south and eastern U.S. will see a partial eclipse.
>
> NASA's plans to study the eclipse include:
>
> * Researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center,
> Greenbelt, MD, will be among international teams of scientists
> who will observe the eclipse from Curacao, Guadeloupe, and
> Aruba, using solar telescopes to analyze the structure and
> magnetic activity of the Sun's corona. Scientists are
> available to discuss the upcoming solar eclipse. Contact Bill
> Steigerwald, Goddard Public Affairs Office, 301/286-8955 (see
> note below for live interviews on NASA TV).
>
> * The NASA/European Space Agency's (ESA) Solar and
> Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft will assist eclipse
> expeditions from around the world by making simultaneous
> observations during the eclipse that will reveal a more
> complete picture of what is occurring on the Sun. Contact Bill
> Steigerwald, Goddard Public Affairs Office, 301/286-8955.
>
> * The NASA/ESA Ulysses spacecraft, now in polar orbit
> around the Sun, will give scientists a "birds-eye view" of huge
> loops of solar material tearing away from the Sun's corona.
> These ejections of solar mass can be seen from ground-based
> observatories during solar eclipses, but Ulysses' orbit above
> the Sun's poles gives scientists another perspective from which
> to better understand these potentially dangerous storms.
> Ulysses scientists are available for interviews about the
> upcoming solar eclipse by contacting Diane Ainsworth in the
> Media Relations Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
> Pasadena, CA, 818/354-5011.
>
>
> NASA TV plans the following:
>
> * An eclipse preview Video File will run on NASA-TV
> several times in February. Elements in the Video File include
> animation showing the path of the eclipse, some safe eclipse
> viewing tips, and examples of how scientists use 'artificial'
> eclipses to study the Sun's corona.
>
> * NASA will offer live interviews with Art Poland of the
> SOHO team. Dr. Poland will give eclipse viewing tips & fun
> facts and explain how scientists use artificial eclipses to
> continuously monitor the Sun's corona. The Live Shots are
> scheduled the evening of Feb. 25 and the morning of Feb. 26.
> Contact Wade Sisler, Goddard Space Flight Center, 301/286-6256.
>
> * A time-lapse movie of the moon's shadow as it sweeps
> across the Earth will be taken by the GOES satellite during the
> four-hour event. If the images can be processed in time, NASA
> TV will broadcast a special edition of the Video File around 4-
> 5 p.m. EST.
>
> NASA Television is available through the GE-2 satellite,
> transponder 9C located at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical
> polarization, with a frequency of 3880 MHz, and audio at 6.8 MHz.
>
>



Need info:How To Adopt Rainforest


From: Lani Black
Subject: Need info:How To Adopt Rainforest
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 09:05:58 -0800
Back to top



I have been enjoying the introductions, wonderful rainforest links that
you all have been sharing, etc. You are such a resource, that I was
wondering if some of you can help me with some questions I received from
a high school group that contacted me via e-mail. They are wanting
ideas to raise money to purchase rainforest, need to know how much it
would cost, and who to contact about the purchase. Please reply to the
lfrf group, as this info would be valuable for those in our discussion
list, too.
reply: discuss-lfrf@passport.ivv.nasa.gov

Thanks ahead of time!
Lani Black, 4th grade teacher
Naches Intermediate
Naches, WA. USA
blackl@destiny.esd105.wednet.edu
http://share1.esd105.wednet.edu/blackl



new teacher!


From: "COLEMAN, HEIDI"
Subject: new teacher!
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 12:15:42 -0400
Back to top



Hello everyone!
I have just subscribed to this group, by way of teachers connect. I
teach 9-12 grade in an alternative high school in NC. My subjects are
Earth Science and Horticulture. I really wish I had known about the
Live from Mars project because it sounds really fun!
I am a second year teacher and looking for ways to get my students
involved. Most of these students have had limited success in regular
schools for various reasons, and I want to give them something
positive about school to get them interested again. My only problem
is that we work on an individually paced schedule, so almost none of
them are on the same thing at the same time. Are there any ways to
accomodate this type of schedule? I would really like to have my
students participate, I just need some ideas.
I look forward to working with this group often- I have already
gotten many very useful web sites to look at and get ideas from!

PS- I went to Costa Rica a couple of years ago and stayed in the
Tropical Cloud Forest. The experience was incredible and really gave
me a better appreciation for the diversity and beauty of our world!

Heidi Coleman
Heidi Coleman
E-mail: hcoleman@caa.k12.nc.us
"What a long strange trip it's been"



Adopt a Rainforest


From: Laura Vermeer
Subject: Adopt a Rainforest
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 17:09:05 -0600
Back to top



To Lani Black in particular and lfrf in general

I have a brochure from a company called Human-i-tees, the environmental
t-shirt company, given to me by another teacher in 1995, who said her
group raised $700 dollars profit and the shirt's quality was excellent.
Call them at 1-800-A-Planet or 1-800-275-2638 to see if they are still
in business. This brochure also included other environmental resources
addresses. I will list a few that I think might pertain to your needs.

Student Environmental Action Coalition (SEAC)
PO Bjox 1168,Attn.HT
Chapel Hill,NC 27514-1168
(919) 967 - 4600
college and high school environmental networking

The Children's Rainforest U.S.
PO Box 936, Attn.Dm
Lewiston, ME 04243
100% of donations go to protecting rainforest land in Costa Rica

Save America's Forests
4 Library Court, SE, 1st floor
Washington, DC 20003
(202) 544-9219
protection of ancient forests

Rainforest Action Network
450 Sansome Street, Suite 700
San Francisco, CA 94111
(415) 398-4404
rainforest protection

Greenpeace
1436 U Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 319-2432
youth activism program / general information

Econet
18 DeBoom Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 442-0220
environmental computer network

The last one might lead you to other sources if you do a net search for
them. I haven't checked it out.




Re: new teacher!


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: Re: new teacher!
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 19:58:11 -0700
Back to top



Dear Heidi, i taught science at an alternative high school near Denver and
the kids loved Live from Mars and LF Antarctica II. The hands on
activities are perfect for most of them. Do you do lab stuff? I would
imagine if you have horticulture, you must have labs. The broadcasts are
easily taped and the kids could watch them when it fits in, singly or in
small groups. The activities in the Teachers Guide are very straight
forward and kids could do some on their own, others with partners or small
groups. A few need a big group, but it's easy to modify things. You'll
love this. Be sure to ask specific questions as you get going, 'cause
someone is sure to be able to give suggestions. Welcome aboard! janet

Janet K. Cook
Sinclair Middle School
300 W. Chenango
Englewood, CO 80110
(303) 781-7817 (w) (303)806-2000 x1904 (vm)
-----Original Message-----


new teacher!


From: "Janet K. Cook"
Subject: new teacher!
Date: Wednesday, February 25, 1998 10:38 AM
Back to top




>Hello everyone!
>I have just subscribed to this group, by way of teachers connect. I
>teach 9-12 grade in an alternative high school in NC. My subjects are
>Earth Science and Horticulture. I really wish I had known about the
>Live from Mars project because it sounds really fun!
>I am a second year teacher and looking for ways to get my students
>involved. Most of these students have had limited success in regular
>schools for various reasons, and I want to give them something
>positive about school to get them interested again. My only problem
>is that we work on an individually paced schedule, so almost none of
>them are on the same thing at the same time. Are there any ways to
>accomodate this type of schedule? I would really like to have my
>students participate, I just need some ideas.
>I look forward to working with this group often- I have already
>gotten many very useful web sites to look at and get ideas from!
>
>PS- I went to Costa Rica a couple of years ago and stayed in the
>Tropical Cloud Forest. The experience was incredible and really gave
>me a better appreciation for the diversity and beauty of our world!
>
>Heidi Coleman
>Heidi Coleman
>E-mail: hcoleman@caa.k12.nc.us
>"What a long strange trip it's been"
>






animals of the rainforest


From: LoreyH717@aol.com
Subject: animals of the rainforest
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 21:34:30 EST
Back to top



We will be discussing animals of the rainforest next week.

As I was reading Marty Stickles journal to my children this week, I asked them
to close their eyes and imagine that they were in the rainforest. The journal
was so vivid that I felt that I was transported to the rain forest myself.

When I finished the journal I asked them imagine that they were falling asleep
in the rain forest, what sounds might they hear? I then asked them what
sounds they might hear when they woke up.

They said they might hear owls at night. They also mentioned that there might
be bats. I told them honestly that we were learning about the rf together and
that I'd have to find out. Are there bats, owls and skunks in the rain
forest?

Thanks.
Loretta Henke
PS 7
New York City



animals of the rainforest


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: animals of the rainforest
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 1998 23:45:30 -0500
Back to top



Loretta,

Some of the animals that you will find in the rainforest are katydids, many
different kinds of ants such as the leaf-cutter ant, azteca ant and army
ant, both 2-toed and 3-toed sloths, Jaguar, Bush dog, Capybara, Toucan,
Red-faced spider monkey, Fig wasp, Giant damselfly, Bromeliad frog,
Antbird, Collared anteater or Tamandua, Capuchin monkey, Parasitic fly,
Cecropia cricket, Fruit bat, Scarlet macaw, Agouti, Emerald tree boa, Sloth
moth, Harpy eagle, Morpho butterfly, Orchid bee, Paca, Hoatzin, Howler
monkey, Giant otter, Brazilian tapir, Bushmaster, Anaconda, Poison dart
frog, and the Cecropia cricket.

If you go to the team section of the LFRF web page you can find some of
these animals mentioned in the journals from the researchers. Susan
Laurance has a description of what it is like to walk through the
rainforest and the animals you would encounter. She also describes an
experience with a spider monkey. Geoff talks about the howler monkeys in
his journal. Claude Gascon talks about his work with frogs and Bill
Laurance's journal which was in updates last week had some excellent
descriptions of animals and the rainforest. His journal has not been
placed on the web page, yet, so if you do not have a copy let me know and I
will send one to you.

One of the things we do at the start of every PTK Module is the KWL chart.
The students write down what they know and what they want to know at the
start of the project. When they finish the project they discuss what they
learned. Have them go back and see what has changed from when they started
the project. You really have a good start on doing this.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov







Re: new teacher!


From: Eileen Bendixsen
Subject: Re: new teacher!
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 1998 00:11:38 -0500
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Hi Heidi,

We have not left Mars completely. Passport to Knowledge will be traveling
to Mars again next school year as we follow NASA's next mission to Mars
with the Mars Climate Orbiter and the Mars Polar Lander.

The students could definitely work at their own pace for this project. You
are going to want to have a day or two a week where the entire class works
on data collection for activities such as One Square Meter, but you could
assign work using the web site and, as Janet said, the live broadcasts
could be taped and used individually or in small groups. Have them do some
of the research activities on the plants and animals of the rainforest.
Some of the activities in the Teacher's Guide can easily be done
individually or in small groups. For these activities the students will be
setting up the lab and collecting data over the course of several days.

One of the great things about PTK projects is that they are very adaptable
and you have plenty of support from the teachers on this list.

Eileen Bendixsen
Moderator, DISCUSS-LFRF
For more information about PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, see:
http://passport.ivv.nasa.gov


At 12:15 PM 2/25/98 -0400, you wrote:
>Hello everyone!
>I have just subscribed to this group, by way of teachers connect. I
>teach 9-12 grade in an alternative high school in NC. My subjects are
>Earth Science and Horticulture. I really wish I had known about the
>Live from Mars project because it sounds really fun!
>I am a second year teacher and looking for ways to get my students
>involved. Most of these students have had limited success in regular
>schools for various reasons, and I want to give them something
>positive about school to get them interested again. My only problem
>is that we work on an individually paced schedule, so almost none of
>them are on the same thing at the same time. Are there any ways to
>accomodate this type of schedule? I would really like to have my
>students participate, I just need some ideas.
>I look forward to working with this group often- I have already
>gotten many very useful web sites to look at and get ideas from!
>
>PS- I went to Costa Rica a couple of years ago and stayed in the
>Tropical Cloud Forest. The experience was incredible and really gave
>me a better appreciation for the diversity and beauty of our world!
>
>Heidi Coleman
>Heidi Coleman
>E-mail: hcoleman@caa.k12.nc.us
>"What a long strange trip it's been"
>
>




Fundraising


From: KDPW49B@prodigy.com (MRS RHONDA B TOON)
Subject: Fundraising
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 1998 00:25:50, -0500
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-- [ From: Rhonda Toon * EMC.Ver #2.5.3 ] --

Hi,

Just wanted to add an idea to the fundraising comments. First, a teacher
at our school did the Humani-tees and they went over very well. I still
have two in my closet--good quality shirts.

The other idea is one my school used for a project two years ago. We
have a school bus converted to resemble a shuttle and the wings needed
repair. To raise money we got six empty water cooler bottles--the
plastic kind that fit on the stand-alone water coolers. Each bottle was
labeled with a different grade k-6 and we announced the "GREAT PENNY
WARS".

Every penny placed in a jar was a plus one and every coin other than a
penny was a negative. So, for example if you were a first grader you
might put five pennies in your jar and then add a dime to the second
grade jar thus giving your grade a plus five and the second grade a
negative 10. Every Friday we announced the totals for the grades and
students graphed the results on a poster in the hall. It was amazing. We
raised over a thousand dollars in one week!

The only pain was getting all the coins to the bank. Because we had so
many the bank agreed to put them in a machine they have to count them
but they were very very heavy. We had buckets and buckets and buckets of
coins and it took quite a few people to carry them all to the truck and
then to unload them.

That was one of our most successful and easiest fund raisers ever and
even the faculty got involved and had fun with it.

We had used this idea before with just a penny drive and earned enough
money to adopt two whales during a campus-wide study of the ocean.

And a funny note. A friend of mine spent part of his summer working with
teachers in Costa Rica. At one point they were in rather primitive
conditions with only cold water available in outdoor type showers. At
breakfast the teachers were all talking about the howler monkeys they
had heard that morning. My friend was too embarrased to tell them it was
actually a co-worker in the cold shower!!!
Rhonda



Re: animals of the rainforest


From: Marty Stickle
Subject: Re: animals of the rainforest
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 1998 00:33:15 -0500
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Loretta,
Thanks for your nice comments about my journal. I'm really glad you and
your kids liked it.

The sounds of the forest are one of those amazing kinds of things. The
specific sounds defend upon local conditions, but generally you hear frogs
during the night. Also, cicadas can be quite loud. I remember back in 1990,
I spent a few weeks in Peru on the Amazon Katydid project. One of the
things we did was to watch and follow one katydid from about 3:30 or 4 am
until sunrise. We sat on little stools with red lights on our heads
starring at the insects. The sounds were terrific. What realy excited me
was that around 5:30 to 6 am, the sky would begin to brighten and gradually
the nighttime sounds would be mixed with and then change to the daytime
sounds. So frogs would give way to crickets and birds.

Yes there are certainly owls and skunks. There are also bats. On several
trips to Costa Rica we have slept outside in the forest in mosquito net
tents. You fall asleep watching bats flying overhead continuosly. Most of
these bats are insect eating bats, so they're our friends to be sure. One
night I watched bats fishing in the river. There was an electric light
shinning on the water in the evening and fish were attracted to this spot
because of the insects falling into the river. So this was a good spot to
watch the fishing bats swooping in. I've also seen raccoons and skunks by
walking along trails in Costa Rica with strong flashlights at night. Of
course, we're usually out looking for cats, but we settle for skinks and
raccoons. One night we spotted an ocelot on the trail!!

Anyway, if you or your kids have other questions, please feel free to post
them.

Marty Stickle






good book


From: Tes Camp
Subject: good book
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 1998 08:31:26 -0600
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Another good rainforest book: "The Most Beautiful Roof in the World"
Exploring the Rainforest Canopy by: Kathryn Lasky. Photographs by:
Christopher G. Knight.
Publisher: Gulliver Green/Harcourt Brace & Company 1997.




New Teacher


From: SHS
Subject: New Teacher
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 10:25:26 -0500
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Hi ! I am a science teacher in a
residential special education facility
in Central New Jersey. The boys here
that will be involved in the LFRF
project are middle school age. My goal
in this project is to involve them in a
real-world hands-on internet project
since at the end of this school year,
most of them will be moving on to other
facilities or back to public school.

Although this is our first PTK project,
we are familiar with several of the past
projects through a colleague's interest.

Carol McArthur,
Somerset Hills School, Warren, New
Jersey
email: shs@ifu.net




new teacher


From: LoreyH717
Subject: new teacher
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 22:18:24 EST
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