NASA TV

The NASA Television Education File airs Weekdays: 8-10 a.m., 4-6 p.m. and 8-10 p.m. Eastern Standard or Daylight Time Weekends: 8-noon, 4-6 p.m. and 8-10 p.m. Eastern Standard or Daylight Time. The Education File may be preempted by other events.

As of 12:01 a.m. EDT July 1, 2005, digital NASA TV will be available on AMC 6, Transponder 17C. Analog NASA TV will no longer be available on satellite AMC 6, Transponder 9. Analog NASA TV will remain on AMC 7, Transponder 18C through NASA's Return to Flight mission.

NASA Television is also available through the World Wide Web.
Visit http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html for further information.

Friday, July 1, 2005
LIVE FROM THE STORM - Program 1: The "Who, What, Where, When, and Why" of Weather
8-9 a.m., 4-5 p.m. and 8-9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Fly with NOAA through a hurricane... sail across the Pacific to take the ocean's temperature... find out how satellites and ground truth are both required... see how and why researchers chase tornadoes-safely! How key scientific principles such as heat and pressure produce storms and influence the climate-and why weather appears where and when it does.

Program 1 shows how the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), works to understand America's weather. Students will see how key scientific principles such as heat and pressure underlie the familiar phenomena we see around us everyday--and why our nation has some of the wildest weather anywhere on Earth!

LIVE FROM THE STORM - Program 2: "Research to the Rescue!"
9-10 a.m., 5-6 p.m. and 9-10 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Program 2 covers why America has some of the wildest weather anywhere on Earth and how we can live with it. Real time interaction with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers on location at the National Severe Storms Laboratory and in the Storm Prediction Center, in Norman, OK and elsewhere around the nation and the planet. How cutting-edge research and new technologies such as Doppler radar, satellites and computers can make our lives safer.

Students will meet the men and women who brave (and we mean this literally) the elements in order to better understand weather and climate, and make accurate and life-saving predictions.

Sunday, July 3, 2005
LIVE FROM THE STORM - Program 1: The "Who, What, Where, When, and Why" of Weather
8-9 a.m. and 4-5 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Fly with NOAA through a hurricane... sail across the Pacific to take the ocean's temperature... find out how satellites and ground truth are both required... see how and why researchers chase tornadoes-safely! How key scientific principles such as heat and pressure produce storms and influence the climate-and why weather appears where and when it does.

Program 1 shows how the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), works to understand America's weather. Students will see how key scientific principles such as heat and pressure underlie the familiar phenomena we see around us everyday--and why our nation has some of the wildest weather anywhere on Earth!

LIVE FROM THE STORM - Program 2: "Research to the Rescue!"
9-10 a.m. and 5-6 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Program 2 covers why America has some of the wildest weather anywhere on Earth and how we can live with it. Real time interaction with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers on location at the National Severe Storms Laboratory and in the Storm Prediction Center, in Norman, OK and elsewhere around the nation and the planet. How cutting-edge research and new technologies such as Doppler radar, satellites and computers can make our lives safer.

Students will meet the men and women who brave (and we mean this literally) the elements in order to better understand weather and climate, and make accurate and life-saving predictions.

Friday, July 8, 2005
"AURORAS - LIVING WITH A STAR"
8-9 a.m., 4-5 p.m. and 8-9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Auroras--the Northern and Southern Lights--are still one of the most dramatic and mysterious natural phenomena. Their shapes and colors both frightened and inspired our ancestors. Now we know much about what causes them and recognize them as a sign of Earth's connection to our local star, the Sun. Their shimmering colors reveal the otherwise invisible layers of the atmosphere: they demonstrate the importance of Earth's magnetosphere to life on our planet.

AURORAS--LIVING WITH A STAR is the first of two new LIVE FROM specials from PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, public television's longest-running series of interactive learning adventures. Together with LIVE FROM THE AURORA, to debut on March 18, 2003, they form the video component of an integrated multiple media package which also includes websites http://passporttoknowledge.com/sun and http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov, hands-on activities and online opportunities.

The broadcasts connect core science concepts to exciting real-world research, using unique imagery from around our planet and up in orbit, as well as advanced computer graphics. Through the programs teachers can help students explore and explain electricity and magnetism, atoms and particles, optics and the electromagnetic spectrum, the structure and dynamics of Earth's atmosphere, and sunspots and solar cycles.

"LIVE FROM THE AURORA"
9-10 a.m., 5-6 p.m. and 9-10 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

As long ago as 2200 B.C., the ancient Chinese called them the "Candle Dragon." Alaskan Natives have stories about spirits in the sky, playing soccer with a walrus skull. In 2001, a contemporary dance group created a dance to celebrate them, using NASA's satellite images in a dramatic combination of art, science and culture. Auroras--the Northern and Southern Lights--remain one of nature's most beautiful and mysterious phenomena. But, powered by the interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere, they are also the most visible indication of our planet's close connection to our local star, the Sun.

AURORAS--LIVING WITH A STAR is the first of two new PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE (P2K) specials exploring the Sun-Earth Connection, and what's beginning to be called "space weather." Using spectacular images from one of the world's only low-light TV cameras able to capture the aurora in real-time, and from NASA astronauts in orbit, AURORAS explains the physics and chemistry that create these "fires in the sky." NASA researchers travel high up in Arctic Canada, close to the North Magnetic Pole, showing how Earth behaves like a giant magnet. Spectacular animations show how storms on the Sun affect life on Earth, including airline travel, power grids and even the daily operations of the U.S. Air Force. On location with researchers and engineers from NASA Wallops in Svalbard, Norway, we discover why sounding rockets have a place alongside satellites in studying the aurora. Viewers see how the colors and shapes of the aurora relate to core science concepts such as electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and the structure and composition of Earth's atmosphere.

The second program, LIVE FROM THE AURORA, is scheduled to air on March 18, 2003, and will feature real-time interaction between students at overnight camp-ins at science centers with NASA researchers on location at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, during this winter's sounding rocket campaign.

Sunday, July 10, 2005
"AURORAS - LIVING WITH A STAR"
10-11 a.m. and 8-9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Auroras--the Northern and Southern Lights--are still one of the most dramatic and mysterious natural phenomena. Their shapes and colors both frightened and inspired our ancestors. Now we know much about what causes them and recognize them as a sign of Earth's connection to our local star, the Sun. Their shimmering colors reveal the otherwise invisible layers of the atmosphere: they demonstrate the importance of Earth's magnetosphere to life on our planet.

AURORAS--LIVING WITH A STAR is the first of two new LIVE FROM specials from PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, public television's longest-running series of interactive learning adventures. Together with LIVE FROM THE AURORA, to debut on March 18, 2003, they form the video component of an integrated multiple media package which also includes websites http://passporttoknowledge.com/sun and http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov, hands-on activities and online opportunities.

The broadcasts connect core science concepts to exciting real-world research, using unique imagery from around our planet and up in orbit, as well as advanced computer graphics. Through the programs teachers can help students explore and explain electricity and magnetism, atoms and particles, optics and the electromagnetic spectrum, the structure and dynamics of Earth's atmosphere, and sunspots and solar cycles.

"LIVE FROM THE AURORA"
11-12 a.m. and 9-10 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

As long ago as 2200 B.C., the ancient Chinese called them the "Candle Dragon." Alaskan Natives have stories about spirits in the sky, playing soccer with a walrus skull. In 2001, a contemporary dance group created a dance to celebrate them, using NASA's satellite images in a dramatic combination of art, science and culture. Auroras--the Northern and Southern Lights--remain one of nature's most beautiful and mysterious phenomena. But, powered by the interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere, they are also the most visible indication of our planet's close connection to our local star, the Sun.

AURORAS--LIVING WITH A STAR is the first of two new PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE (P2K) specials exploring the Sun-Earth Connection, and what's beginning to be called "space weather." Using spectacular images from one of the world's only low-light TV cameras able to capture the aurora in real-time, and from NASA astronauts in orbit, AURORAS explains the physics and chemistry that create these "fires in the sky." NASA researchers travel high up in Arctic Canada, close to the North Magnetic Pole, showing how Earth behaves like a giant magnet. Spectacular animations show how storms on the Sun affect life on Earth, including airline travel, power grids and even the daily operations of the U.S. Air Force. On location with researchers and engineers from NASA Wallops in Svalbard, Norway, we discover why sounding rockets have a place alongside satellites in studying the aurora. Viewers see how the colors and shapes of the aurora relate to core science concepts such as electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and the structure and composition of Earth's atmosphere.

The second program, LIVE FROM THE AURORA, is scheduled to air on March 18, 2003, and will feature real-time interaction between students at overnight camp-ins at science centers with NASA researchers on location at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, during this winter's sounding rocket campaign.

Friday, July 15, 2005
Passport to the Universe - Program 1: "LIVE FROM A BLACK HOLE"
8-9 a.m., 4-5 p.m. and 8-9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Black holes--places where gravity is so extreme that not even light can escape! After centuries of speculation, we've now seen convincing evidence of black holes a few times the mass of our Sun and some a million or even a billion times the mass of the Sun, lurking at the center of our and other galaxies. This introductory program shows how NASA's CHANDRA and other missions and observatories use X-ray astronomy to reveal some of the most exotic and extreme phenomena in the Universe. Sequences such as THE LIFE AND DEATH OF STARS relates mass, color and temperature of stars to key scientific principles found in every space and physical science curriculum. We see how high school students using CHANDRA data discovered a pulsar in a supernova remnant, and won the $100,000 Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology competition. And we go behind the scenes, into clean rooms and workshops, to see the long years of effort and technical ingenuity it took to build Earth's most powerful X-ray telescope, and meet the enthusiastic young men and women who created CHANDRA and keep it operating.

Passport to the Universe - Program 2: "LIVE FROM THE EDGE OF SPACE AND TIME"
9-10 a.m., 5-6 p.m. and 9-10 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time

Originating live from the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge, MA, this program allows students to interact via the Internet with CHANDRA scientists (including CXO Director Harvey Tananbaum and Project Scientist Martin Weisskopf from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center) and to explore some of the most exciting and mysterious phenomena in the Universe. Students will find out how to track CHANDRA and other telescopes in real time via the Web, and how to link to the latest and most beautiful images. They'll see some of the most distant and ancient objects we know of--quasars and distant galaxies--and find out how black holes power some of the most energetic events in the entire Universe. But on the very edge of space, time and current knowledge are phenomena like "dark matter" and "dark energy." Current thinking is that what we see out there in space is not all that exists. At Fermilab, we track the collisions of matter and anti-matter and find out how astronomy and particle physics are both being used to understand the dynamic and evolving universe in which we live. The mini-series concludes by looking ahead to the new missions and telescopes which today's students may themselves use tomorrow in the ongoing exploration of the Universe.

The NASA TV Education Schedule can be found at:
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/schedule/fileschedule/index.html